Antonioni


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Antonioni

Michelangelo (mike'land[zh]elo). born 1912, Italian film director; his films include L'Avventura (1959), La Notte (1961), Blow-Up (1966), Zabriskie Point (1970), Beyond the Clouds (1995), and Just To Be Together (2002)
References in periodicals archive ?
With one startling, painterly composition after another, Red Desert creates a nearly apocalyptic image of its time, and confirms Antonioni as cinema's pre-eminent poet of the modern age.
Antonioni associates sexual adventurism with the nonperformance to exhibit oneself innovatively.
sobre la materia y los cuerpos, Larrain, como Antonioni, nos provoca la
In this then, Antonioni is able to maintain that surface objectivity when it comes to the feelings of his characters, while at the same time providing exterior signs and signals as to potential internal desires, emotions, and fears.
Antonioni here offers a blow-up of a different sort, a silent, bloodless disintegration that turns "THE END" into an "inscriptio," one of the three components of traditional emblem.
Thus the presentation of the strappalacrime, weepie or post-war divas can be understood in terms of cultural and historical influences from previous periods and in the work of the recognized auteurs such as Visconti, Fellini, De Sica, Antonioni and Wertmuller.
Giairo Daghini: It is almost a commonplace to talk about Antonioni as the filmmaker of the crisis of sentiments or, more generally, of a filmmaker of the crisis.
Postmodernity from films by Michelangelo Antonioni and Brian de Palma
The book is divided into four sections: "Before the Revolution," which reviews the cultural context that set the stage for the shifts of the 60s; "The New Cinemas," which outlines the various features that distinguish the many national new waves; "Movements," which features brief profiles of five important nations and regions (Britain, France, Italy, Poland and eastern Europe, and Latin America); and "Three Auteurs," a chapter focusing on a trio of key figures of the era (Godard, Antonioni, Pasolini).
of New South Wales, Australia) has edited this book about post-war developments in film theory using observations from some of the most notable directors of the time, including Alfred Hitchcock, Michelangelo Antonioni, Robert Altman, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and others.
From the documentary work of Michelangelo Antonioni on the River Po to the creations of Pier Paolo Pasolini, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti, Italian Locations is fraught with works that defined a sense of place--a place transformed and reconstructed in the wake of destruction.
They have done so notably in films by Michaelangelo Antonioni (l'Avventura and l'Eclisse), by Federico Fellini (La Dolce Vita and 8 1/2), and by Michael Landry (The Hours).