Antony Hewish


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Hewish, Antony

 

Born May 11, 1924, in Fowey, Cornwall. British astronomer. Fellow of the Royal Society of London (1968).

Hewish was educated at Cambridge University and became a professor there in 1971. He investigated the scintillation of radio sources that subtend a small angle and, independently of the Soviet astronomer V. V. Vitkevich, suggested that the outer layers of the solar corona could be investigated by studying the radio emissions of the Crab Nebula as they move through the corona. He headed the group of radio astronomers that discovered pulsars in 1967.

Hewish received a Nobel Prize in 1974.

References in periodicals archive ?
Her observation, made together with her supervisor, Antony Hewish, is considered to be one of the greatest astronomical discoveries of the twentieth century.
Her thesis supervisor Dr Antony Hewish won a Nobel Prize in Physics.
Her work as a postgraduate student at Cambridge University helped discover the first radio pulsars and led to a Nobel Prize for her supervisor Antony Hewish.
Her work as a postgraduate student at Cambridge University in helping discover the first radio pulsars led to a Nobel Prize for her supervisor Antony Hewish.
1967 Jocelyn Bell and Antony Hewish (shown) discover the first pulsar by recording rapid pulses of radio waves emitted by a celestial object.
Bell's mentor at Cambridge, Antony Hewish, published the results of the survey and was later rewarded with a Nobel prize for the discovery of pulsars, while Bell received a nod in the form of honorable mention.
For me, this new planetarium is one of the most attractive things about the observatory's Time and Space project," says radio astronomer and museum trustee Jocelyn Bell Burnell (Oxford University), who with Antony Hewish discovered pulsars (spinning neutron stars) in 1967.