Formicariidae

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Formicariidae

[‚fȯr·mə·kə′rī·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The antbirds, a family of suboscine birds in the order Passeriformes.

Formicariidae

 

(antbirds), a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. Body length, 9.5–36 cm. The bill is laterally compressed and sometimes hooked at the tip. Terrestrial species are long-legged, and arboreal species short-legged. The males are garbed in contrasting colors, often with white, black, or red patches or transverse stripes; the females have monochromatic coloration. There are 222 species of antbirds, distributed from southern Mexico to central Argentina. They live hidden in forests or thickets. Antbirds build their nests in shrubs or, less frequently, on the ground. A clutch contains two or, rarely, three eggs, which are incubated for 14—17 days. Antbirds feed principally on insects, mainly ants.

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A grapefruit-size bird that hops as if its legs were pogo sticks, the jocotoco antpitta was first described by a Western scientist, Bob Ridgely, in 1997.
If any bird could evade scientists for so long, it's an antpitta, says John W.
It has the plump, almost tail-less body characteristic of antpittas, or "eggs on legs," as Braun calls them.
The nest of Jocotoco Antpitta is a deep, bulky cup similar in form to the described nests of other Grallaria (Greeney et al.
Previous observations of ah older, dependent fledgling Jocotoco Antpitta (Greeney and Gelis 2005b) were made on 30 November 2003 (HFG, unpubl, data).
Clutch size remains undocumented for Jocotoco Antpitta, but repeated sightings of single fledglings (Greeney and Gelis 2005b, this study) combined with our observations of a single nestling, suggest this species may lay a smaller clutch than most other Grallaria (Greeney et al.
Notes on egg laying, incubation and nestling care in Scaled Antpitta Grallaria guatimalensis.
The small antpitta genus Grallaricula comprises eight species (Krabbe and Schulenberg 2003).
The Rusty-breasted Antpitta has a disjunct distribution ranging from Venezuela and northern Colombia (subspecies ferrugineipectus and rara) to northern Peru and western Bolivia (subspecies leymebambae) (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Krabbe and Schulenberg 2003).
The Rusty-breasted Antpitta was vocal throughout the day during the breeding season.
Rufous Antpittas (Grallaria rufula) and Plain-tailed Wrens (Pheugopedius euophrys) altered their singing behavior in response to playback by increasing vocalizations (Harris and Haskell 2013).