aortic valve

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aortic valve

[ā′ȯrd·ik ′valv]
(anatomy)
A heart valve comprising three flaps which guards the passage from the left ventricle to the aorta and prevents the backward flow of blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The BELIEVE study is designed to enhance the understanding of reduced leaflet motion phenomenon, while providing important information to clinicians and patients to ensure the best possible outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement, said Dr.
He had to wait for few months for the new larger valve to be launched in Bahrain before undergoing the procedure, known as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
All patients undergoing the procedure had severe aortic valve stenosis with the mean echo derived pressure gradient (PG) across the aortic valve of 70 +- 28 mmHg.
For years, the only way to replace a severely diseased aortic valve was with open-heart surgery, but the operation requires a long recovery period and may be too risky for some patients.
Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is a rare congenital anomaly with an estimated incidence of 0.
SALUS is a prospective, multicenter clinical trial of the Direct Flow Medical Transcatheter Aortic Valve System, which will enroll 912 subjects in up to 45 sites in the US Mubashir Mumtaz, MD, FACS, FACC, chief of cardiothoracic surgery, and William Bachinsky, MD, FACC, medical director of vascular services, serve as co-principal investigators locally at PinnacleHealth.
Designed with a low profile and interior-mounted leaflets (which allow the passage of blood through the heart) to help lessen the risk of coronary obstruction, the company's new aortic valve will be evaluated in the trial for its ease of implantation, durability and hemodynamic performance (blood flow) as well as allow for future transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve interventions.
KEY WORDS: Aortic valve, aortic valve stenosis, valve surgery, transvalvular gradient, echocardiography.
The doctor said the aortic valve needs replacing due to various reasons such as age, infection and rheumatic valve disease.
The traditional treatment is to replace the aortic valve through open-heart surgery.
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it will begin covering transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for Medicare patients under certain conditions.