Apemantus


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Apemantus

churlish, sarcastic advisor of Timon. [Br. Lit.: Timon of Athens]
References in periodicals archive ?
And Apemantus the professional scorner of men is like Jaques in needing an audience of antagonists against whom to proclaim his Cynic autonomy.
Only those who are not part of this perfect circle--Alcibiades, who gives his deepest commitment to war, Apemantus the Cynic philosopher, who loves being right more than having goods, and the servants, who admire their master from a social distance--manifest friendship when Timon has need of them.
It is not clear that Timon has chosen his isolation as Apemantus has, but even in his wealth he is like the Cynic very much alone.
Other characters catch the eye too, perhaps the brutally honest Apemantus, who foresees Timon's ruin and warns him of false friends, or Alcibiades who speaks Timon's final epitaph.
The guests' drunken profligacy was illustrated as the bread which Timon distributed among them became missiles flying between them, much to the sneering disgust of Bo Poraj's huge and shaggy Apemantus and the party broke up with the antics of an inebriated guest running around the stage, flashing his genitals.
But in every aspect of Timon's character we see excess, as Apemantus observes: "[t]he middle of humanity thou never knowest, / but the extremity of both ends" (Timon of Athens, 14.
Timon himself recognises how fluid bodily humours are early on in the play when he chastises Apemantus' bad 'humour'; 'humour' here signifies his disposition and is invariably linked to humoral theory, which suggests that Apemantus is ruled by melancholy.
Then comes, dropping after all, apemantus, discontentedly, like himself apemantus I scorn thy meat.
22) When Apemantus rejects what Timon's feast offers, it seems at first that he and not the feast is the problem.
Watching the debauchery is Apemantus, the only one who refuses to sponge off Timon's generosity, played in show-stealing style by Richard McCabe.
Who lives," Apemantus rhetorically asks, "that's not depraved or depraves?
And like the wrath of Apemantus and Timon, Coriolanus's anger seems to activate and fuel his backward voice.