Aphek

Aphek

(ā`fĕk), in the Bible. 1 Canaanite royal town, the modern Ras el-Ain or Rosh Hayim (Israel). Herod called it Antipatris. It is mentioned in Egyptian documents dating from the 19th cent. B.C. It is probably the same place as the unidentified Aphekah. 2 Canaanite city in Asher. 3 Place where Ahab defeated Benhadad. 4, 5 Two places where the Philistines encamped, perhaps the same as (1.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Turkey said Monday it has notified Ella Aphek, the Israeli Embassy's deputy head of mission, that she and other senior Israeli diplomats must leave by Wednesday now that Turkey has decided to downgrade its diplomatic ties with Israel to the level of second secretary.
ANKARA, September 05, 2011 (TUR) - Minister-Counsellor Ella Aphek with the Israeli Embassy in Ankara was summoned to Turkish Foreign Ministry.
73) One of the two lexical fragments found at Aphek contains triplicate entries that consist of a logogram followed by syllabically spelled Akkadian and Canaanite equivalents, each separated by a gloss mark; entries for "water," "wine," and perhaps "oil" and "honey" are partly preserved, written on what appears to have been a cylindrical clay prism mounted on a stick.
The lexical texts from both Ashkelon and Aphek certainly demonstrate that at least some scribes in Canaan were cognizant of the languages underlying cuneiform writing, and that they deliberately engaged not only in Canaanite-Akkadian translation, but in developing syllabic Canaanite spellings corresponding to logograms and to Akkadian spellings.
the Arab chronicler al-Baladhuri lists Aphek among villages and fortresses conquered by the Arabs in 638.
The name of Gerontius is not uncommon, and we know of bishops and an archimandrite of this name in the, fourth and fifth centuries, but no Bishop Gerontius of Aphek appears in lists of those attending church synods or in other literary sources.
More than a third of the inscribed objects come from three sites: Taanach (17), Hazor (15), and Aphek (8).
Aphek 8: Administrative fragment (location unknown).
Until now it has not been possible to explain the long period of time which separated the expansion of Philistine influence during the time of Ramesses VI-VII, and the earliest appearance of the Philistines in the literary record: the Philistine victory over the Israelites between Aphek and Ebenezer ('Izbet Sartah) c.
Yet the problem remains that Tel Aphek is only a single site--and thus not necessarily representative of trends evidenced countrywide.
A small faience plaque naming Ramesses II from Aphek, possibly a model brick, with two columns on each face: a reference to a deity is in the leftmost columns (facing right), and the nomen and the prenomen are in the rightmost columns (facing left; Weinstein 1981: 19f.