Aphelinid


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Aphelinid

 

(Aphelinus mali), a parasitic hymenopteron from the family Chalcididae.

The body of the aphelinid is 1.2 mm long. It is found in North America, where it is used to combat the woolly aphid, a dangerous apple pest. The female parasite lays her eggs in the aphids, where the larvae develop; this causes the aphids to die. The aphelinid was introduced into the USSR during the period 1926–30, multiplied in laboratories, and released in the Caucasus and the Ukraine in aphid-infested orchards, where it acclimatized and now keeps down the reproduction of the wooly aphid.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Material bred from whiteflies is typically assumed to be hyperparasitic on aphelinid primary parasitoids developing in the same host (Viggiani 1982; Evans 2007).
Trichogramma pretiosum had a broader distribution than the aphelinid wasp, which was collected only in Tucuman (northwestern Argentina).
aligarhensis [5] Eulophid parasitoids attacking leafminer larvae [6] Aphelinid parasitoid attacking scales [7] Mymarid parasitoid attacking tingid eggs [8] Mymarid parasitoid attacking cicadellid eggs [9] Aphelinid hyperparasitoid attacking D.
nigra parasitoids from 6 families: Encyrtidae, Aphelinidae, Eupelmidae, Eulophidae, Pteromalidae and Signiphoridae, but the encyrtid and aphelinid species were the most dominant.
Aphelinid wasps are a major source of biocontrol of economically important pest species of hemipteran coccoids, aphids and aleyrodids (Woolley 1997; Hanson et al.
Aphelinid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) of armoured scale insects (Homoptera: Diaspididae) from India.
Reviews of the species in the more important aphelinid genera used for biocontrol in Mexico--Aphytis Howard, Eretmocerus Haldeman and Coccophagus Westwood--were published (Myartseva 2006a, 2006b, 2011a).
This aphelinid is a cosmopolitan armored scale parasitoid that is widespread in the United States, attacking many armored scale species (Diaspididae) (Krombein et al.
mundus, aphelinid parasitoids of Bemisia argentifohi (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) European J.
In addition, a pre-existing cosmopolitan polyphagous aphelinid, Encarsia citrina (Crawford), was observed in samples from Massachusetts.
The gender was not determined for all tested aphelinid individuals because the small amount of sexual dimorphism made determining gender difficult until distinguishing morphological characteristics were better understood.