Apollinarianism


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Related to Apollinarianism: Docetism, Ebionism, Gnosticism, Pelagianism, Monothelitism

Apollinarianism

(əpŏlĭnâr`ēənĭzəm), heretical doctrine taught by Apollinaris or Apollinarius (c.315–c.390), bishop of Laodicea, near Antioch. A celebrated scholar and teacher, author of scriptural commentary, philosophy, and controversial treatises, he propounded the theory that Jesus possessed the LogosLogos
[Gr.,=word], in Greek and Hebrew metaphysics, the unifying principle of the world. The central idea of the Logos is that it links God and man, hence any system in which the Logos plays a part is monistic. The Greek Heraclitus held (c.500 B.C.
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 in place of a human mind, and hence, while perfectly divine, he was not fully human. Apollinarianism was popular in spite of its repeated condemnation, particularly by the First Council of Constantinople. It anticipated MonophysitismMonophysitism
[Gr.,=belief in one nature], a heresy of the 5th and 6th cent., which grew out of a reaction against Nestorianism. It was anticipated by Apollinarianism and was continuous with the principles of Eutyches, whose doctrine had been rejected in 451 at Chalcedon (see
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
After its condemnations by the Councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon, Apollinarianism retreated into the welcoming bosom of the Monophysite Churches.
But this does not mean that Rahner has lapsed into Monophysitism (from below), Monotheletism, or Apollinarianism, as for him Christ's human nature remains genuinely human, that is to say, it is divinely human, human in a divine way, or, equally, divine in a human way.