Apollo program

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Apollo program

[ə′päl·ō ¦prō·grəm]
(aerospace engineering)
The scientific and technical program of the United States that involved placing men on the moon and returning them safely to earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geoff, from Bishopbriggs, near Glasgow, says: "I remember watching the Apollo missions and looking up at nights dreaming of when I would be up there.
Dr Hergenrother said: "Rather than looking like a known asteroid, the colours were consistent with properties of an object covered with paint used on the Apollo missions.
The NASA video is from original film footage shot on the moon and in lunar orbit during the Apollo missions and has been kept in below freezing storage for historical preservation," explained Petrovich.
Although the Apollo missions brought back nearly 400 kilograms of rocks, scientists still know precious little about the moon's topography, gravitational field, and overall composition.
This experience includes being on the NASA Apollo mission team where he earned a patent for developing a communications systems enhancement technique.
Chief engineer Kiyotaka Yamamoto said: "This is Japan's Apollo mission.
This summer is the 30th anniversary of the moon walk, and is also the 30th anniversary of the first man-made photograph of our whole planet from space, as taken by an astronaut on an Apollo mission.
Though it had been expected that LRO would be able to resolve the remnants of the Apollo mission, these first images came before the spacecraft reached its final mapping orbit.
The safe contained lunar samples from every Apollo mission.
Scientists have long searched for proof that the flags survived after the final manned Apollo mission, Apollo 17, left the moon Dec.
Scientists have studied more than 70 of these cliffs, called lobate scarps, using Apollo mission images from the 1970s.
Now, 40 years after the last Apollo mission explored the moon, we are beginning to better understand the entire moon, including the six Apollo sites, and how its surface evolved to its current state.