Apollo program

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Apollo program

[ə′päl·ō ¦prō·grəm]
(aerospace engineering)
The scientific and technical program of the United States that involved placing men on the moon and returning them safely to earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched the first Apollo mission in 1969, which brought the first humans to land on the moon's untouched surface.
In his experiment, dust collected on small solar cells attached to a matchbox-sized case over the course of six years, throughout three Apollo missions.
The Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s sent astronauts to orbit around, and in six cases land on, the moon.
Over the next few years, five more Apollo missions took astronauts to the Moon.
The primary and backup Commander and LEM Pilot for the Apollo missions 15, 16, and 17 were the principal participants.
Another anniversary tour takes in the Launch Control Center, where Nasa directors and engineers supervised all 152 launches for the space shuttle and Apollo missions.
Each of the six manned Apollo missions that landed on the moon planted an American flag in the lunar dirt.
The company's top seller is virtual - the aforementioned RockSim software - while Apogee's kits are more visceral, ranging from the easy-to-make-and-fly Apprentice to an authentic replica of the Saturn V that carried Apollo missions to the Moon, measuring over 5 feet in height.
For their experiments, the scientists produced microscopic copies of moon rock collected by the Apollo missions and melted them at the extremely high pressures and temperatures found inside the Moon.
Bursting with OTT geeky enthusiasm, brainy Brian gushes: "The Apollo missions are the greatest achievement in human history.
Academics from the Faulkes Telescope Project at Glamorgan University have started combing a vast region of space in an effort to find "Snoopy" - the only surviving lunar ascent module of the Apollo missions to the moon.
Combined with high-resolution imagery, an analysis of rock and soil samples returned by the earlier Apollo missions as well as computer models, the gravity maps are expected to fill in the biggest missing piece in the puzzle of how Earth's natural satellite formed and evolved.