Apollo program

(redirected from Apollo programme)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Apollo programme: Apollo lunar missions

Apollo program

[ə′päl·ō ¦prō·grəm]
(aerospace engineering)
The scientific and technical program of the United States that involved placing men on the moon and returning them safely to earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the legacy of the Apollo missions Buzz said 'All sorts of people from engineers to airline pilots who report back on what it was that got them into aerospace and science, developing engineering and math, say it was the Apollo programme that inspired them'.
Commenting on the interview, E&T Editor-in-Chief Dickon Ross said:' The Apollo programme is mankind's most outstanding engineering achievement and we should never under estimate it's influence in inspiring future generations of engineers.
Yet two years later, after a similar mission was aborted, the axe fell on the Apollo programme.
Yet at a later Apollo party, Nixon said: "Here's to the Apollo programme.
Eleven per cent of people polled thought the Apollo programme was a recent as the 1980s, while just 68 per cent knew that the first moon landing took place in 1969.
1967: Three astronauts died in the Apollo 1fire: Tragedy struck the Apollo programme when a flash fire occurred during a launch test of the space vehicle being prepared for the first piloted flight in Cape Canaveral.
THE Apollo programme may have captivated the world's imagination and been the greatest scientific adventure in the history of man, but there are no plans to repeat it.
Eleven per cent of people polled thought the Apollo programme was a recent as the 1980s, with just 68 per cent knowing that the first moon landing took place in 1969.
Hosted by The Planetary Society, the day will feature lectures from space experts addressing the history of the original Apollo programme, the follow-up landing by Apollo 17 and conspiracy theories surrounding the event.
This tragedy overshadowed the new Apollo programme but led to safety changes which created a more efficient spacecraft, pushing Apollo further towards its ultimate destination - the moon.
But one of the highlights of his research came in the 1960s when he was invited by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the USA to put the ear of a dogfish into orbit to study its effects as part of the Apollo programme.