Apostolici


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Apostolici

 

apostolic brothers, adherents of a peasant-plebeian heresy in northern Italy. The Apostolici sect was founded in the region of Parma in about 1260 by Segarelli; from 1300 it was led by Dolcino. The Apostolici preached the necessity of a life of poverty and the renunciation of property, alluding to the teaching of the Apostles (hence the name) and castigating the Catholic clergy. They were also against secular feudalists, the urban wealthy, and the feudal state. They played a very large role in the peasant uprising of Dolcino (1304–07); after suppression of the revolt, they were subjected to cruel persecution. However, the Apostolici continued their preaching in northern Italy, southern France, Spain, and Germany.

N. A. BORTNIK

References in periodicals archive ?
Quod Apostolici Muneris: Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII on Socialism.
Leo XIII, who succeeded Pius in 1878, shared his predecessor's evaluation of the contemporary world, as is clear from his second encyclical, Quod Apostolici Muneris (1878): "The revered majesty and power of kings have won such fierce hatred from these seditious people that disloyal traitors .
Council of Vienne, Constitution Fidel Catholicae; Lateran V, Bull Apostolici Regiminis; Vatican II, Gaudium et Spes, no.
The Thomistic view of the universe as an ordered hierarchy of being can be found in Leo's encyclical, Quod Apostolici Muneris ("On the Evils of Socialism," 1878) where he attacks the socialist belief in the absolute equality of all men and contrasts it with "the true equality of the Gospel.
Ebbe amplissimo privilegio dal Cardinal Giulio de' Medici, cui fit carissimo, di crear Protonotarj Apostolici d'onore, fat Dottori e legitimare bastardi.
Leo's 1878 encyclical Quod Apostolici Muneris spoke of the socialistic ideas of the day as a "deadly plague" and condemned communism and nihilism as "barbarous.
Daniel Price, "The Origins of Lateran V's Apostolici Regiminis," Annuarium historiae conciliorum 17 (1985) 464-72, at 465-67, and in my "Prophecy and the Fifth Lateran Council (1512-1517)," in Prophetic Rome in the High Renaissance Period: Essays, ed.