Apothegm


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Apothegm

 

a generalized, polished, and pithy saying attributed to a specific author. Examples are “Harmony creates friendship” (Democritus), “Education develops talents but does not create them” (Voltaire), and “A lie offends the listener and debases him in the speaker’s eyes” (Chekhov). An aphorism is a type of apothegm.

References in periodicals archive ?
My take on apothegms is that they are perceived to communicate what MBAs call "the value proposition," but the precise meaning of a value proposition is fuzzy.
An ingenious interpretation that turns this apothegm upside down is accomplished by a slight change of pronunciation.
Moreover, assuming an actual inscription on the urn would require a severing of the brief apothegm from the comment "that is all / Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know," which can hardly be meant to crowd the urn's surface in addition.
A Mystic Garden is a slim book of meditations and apothegm about a year in a garden, with the four seasons serving as metaphors for life.
His apothegm, "poetry no longer imposes itself, it exposes itself," could have come straight out of Braque's notebook.
And take a small further pleasure in the fact that the originator of so trenchant an apothegm ("for the law to be known .
28) </pre> <p>It is easy, as Bill notes, to dismiss this dictum as a reductive apothegm written by an "unremarkable" justice.
In Two Sisters, Vidal approvingly quotes the apothegm of "our country's first serious novelist," Nathaniel Hawthorne: "'The United States are fit for many purposes but not to live in.
It has been so frequently said by the courts as to have become a legal apothegm, that courts are not concerned with the mere wisdom or policy of regulatory statutes in the exercise of the police power.
Whether adage, aphorism, apothegm or axiom, it contains a nugget of wisdom, expressed incisively and memorably.
familiar common-law apothegm, sic utere tuo ut alienum non laedas (so