Appalachia


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Appalachia,

region: see Appalachian MountainsAppalachian Mountains
, mountain system of E North America, extending in a broad belt c.1,600 mi (2,570 km) SW from the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec prov., Canada, to the Gulf coastal plain in Alabama. Main sections in the system are the White Mts., Green Mts.
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Appalachia

[¦ap·ə¦lā·chə]
(geology)
Proposed borderland along the southeastern side of North America, seaward of the Appalachian geosyncline in Paleozoic time.

Appalachia

West Virginia coal mining region known for its abysmal poverty. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 160]
See: Poverty

Appalachia

a highland region of the eastern US, containing the Appalachian Mountains, extending from Pennsylvania to Alabama
References in periodicals archive ?
Catholics can also help bring about a brighter future for Appalachia and the world at large.
For example, while presenting a conference session on Appalachian literature, my colleague and I asked participants to brainstorm words that the term Appalachia brings to mind.
Appalachia knows many skies--some blue in mid-August, some "Blue as a new translation of Longinus on the sublime.
The coal fields of Appalachia match up almost perfectly with what once was the natural range of the American chestnut," Kempthorne said.
More than anything else, Weiner contends that the boom town atmosphere of rapid economic and social change in Appalachia enabled them to successfully establish a commercial niche in coalfield communities that distinguished them from Jewish merchants in other areas of the South who catered to an outcast population or in northern communities where they were often discriminated against by already well-established elites.
A look at educational attainment in Appalachia over the same 1970-2000 period shows the same pattern in reverse.
However, there have been swings in poverty within Appalachia over the period, due in part to the coal boom in the 1970s, which drove down poverty, and the coal bust in the 1980s, which drove it back up (see "The Economic Impact of the Coal Boom and Bust" in the Recommended Readings).
Low-income whites in Appalachia, Mississippi Valley, $16,390, 75 years.
This past summer, activists from all over the country swarmed Appalachia with the mission to interrupt business as usual for coal companies and government agencies involved with mountaintop removal mining.
This paper identifies the geographical area and demographic characteristics of Appalachia, describes the common characteristics that are a part of the Appalachian culture, and provides current statistics of children and adults living in Appalachia who have disabilities.
2) This dialogue clearly demonstrates that pre-industrial Appalachia has moved fro m the category of "a people without a history" into the mainstream of rural economic and social history.