Appomattox Court House National Historical Park

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Appomattox Court House National Historical Park

Address:Hwy 24
PO Box 218
Appomattox, VA 24522

Phone:434-352-8987
Fax:434-352-8330
Web: www.nps.gov/apco/
Size: 1,774 acres.
Established: Authorized as Appomattox Battlefield Site on June 18, 1930; designated a national historical park on April 15, 1954.
Location:In south-central Virginia, 92 miles west of Richmond and 18 miles east of Lynchburg. It is on VA 24, 3 miles northeast of the town of Appomattox, which sits astride US 460.
Facilities:Picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail. Entrance fee required.
Activities:Self-guided walking tours, and living history and ranger talks (summer).
Special Features:Here on April 9, 1865, General Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederacy's largest field army to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant. The site includes the McLean home (surrender site), the village of Appomattox Court House, and the home and burial place of Joel Sweeney - the popularizer of the modern five string banjo. There are twenty seven original 19th-century structures on the site.

See other parks in Virginia.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Richmond's defenses finally collapsed in April 1865, Lee was only able to flee as far as Appomattox Court House before Grant caught up and compelled his surrender without the need for any final, bloody climax.
Enjoy a cold beer with an Appomattox Court House Statesmetal mug.
Lee, Confederate States of America, at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, in 1861.
At the Appomattox Court House, General Lee laid down his arms, and then it was all finished.
Lee surrendered to Union army leader Ulysses S Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865.
The conflict was set aside until the Civil War, but even after the Emancipation Proclamation and the truce at the Appomattox Court House came the tragedy of segregation, the crucible of the civil rights movement and the assassination of Dr.
It never fell but on April 9, 1865 it was 25 miles east of Lynchburg, at the village of Appomattox Court House, that the south's General Lee surrendered to Ulysses S.
5" is displayed at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia.
It never fell but on April 9 1865 it was 25 miles east of Lynchburg, at the village of Appomattox Court House, that the south's General Lee surrendered to Ulysses S.
Following Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, and Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, the South watched anxiously to see how the U.
Bragg held the post until January 23, 1865, when Lee took charge again and held the post until the surrender at Appomattox court house on April 9, 1865, although this is remembered as April 12.