apricot

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apricot

[Arabic from Lat.,=early ripe], tree, Prunus armeniaca, and its fruit, of the plum genus of the family Rosaceae (roserose,
common name for some members of the Rosaceae, a large family of herbs, shrubs, and trees distributed over most of the earth, and for plants of the genus Rosa, the true roses.
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 family), native to temperate Asia and long cultivated in Armenia. The fruit is used raw, canned, preserved, and dried. California is the chief place of cultivation in the United States, although by selecting suitable varieties the apricot can be grown in most regions where the peach is hardy. Apricots are used in the making of a cordial and also for apricot brandy. A number of apricot-plum hybrids, such as the plumcot, Pluot, and Aprium, have been developed. Apricots are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.
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apricot

apricot

High fiber, beta carotene, Vitamin A, C, E, K, B6, Lycopene, potassium, manganese, iron, phosphorus. The kernel is great for prostate, parasites and cancer, because it has vitamin B17 like apple seeds. But only eat a few at a time, don’t go crazy.

Apricot

 

(Armeniaca), a genus of fruit-bearing trees or bushes of the rose family and plum subfamily. The trees reach a height of 15 m. The leaves are elliptical or broadly oviform, with elongated lobes at the top. The flowers, one per bud, are white or pink, and they open before the leaves. The fruit is a meaty or dryish drupe, usually fuzzy, and the pit is almost completely smooth. There are eight strains in Asia.

In the USSR there are five species of apricots: the common apricot (Armeniaca vulgaris) with juicy and edible fruit, which includes most of the cultivated strains; the juicy but not tasty Manchurian apricot (Armeniaca manshurica); the Siberian apricot (Armeniaca sibirica) and the related David apricot (Armeniaca Davidiana) with inedible fruit; and the black, or hairy, apricot (Armeniaca dasycarpa) with reddish purple or dark purple, fuzzy, tart fruit, including the cultivated strains Tlor tsiran, Aleksan-driiskii chernyi, and Ol’Khrod.

Apricots grow best on sunlit, well-aerated and drained slopes with light (subsandy, loamy, or sandy) or stony soils; they cannot grow in heavy clay or salty soils. Stagnant subsoil water near the surface has a detrimental effect on the root system. The apricot bears fruit quickly—within three or four years. Apricots are cultivated in northern India, Iran, China, North and South Africa, southern Europe, North America, and Australia. In the USSR they are cultivated in Central Asia, Transcaucasia, and the south of the European part of the country.

The fruit contains 4 to 20 percent sugar, malic, citric, and other acids, 0.38–1.27 percent pectins, and up to 10 mg of carotene. The seeds contain 29–58 percent fat. Apricots are consumed fresh, dried (variously called kaisa, kuraga, or uriuk), or canned (stewed apricots, juice, or jams). In the USSR apricots are planted in field-protecting forests and as seedling stock for peaches. In regions with a favorable climate, apricots bear fruit annually and yield a harvest of 8–12 tons per hectare or more. The major strains of apricot in the USSR include Krasnoshchekii, Ananasnyi, and Krasnyi partizan in the European part; Khurmai, Sub-khany, Isfarak, and Kursadyk in Central Asia; and Shalakh and Sateni in Transcaucasia. Highly frost-resistant strains—for instance, the Tovarishch, Luchshii michurin-skii, and Vynoslivyi—are particularly interesting because they can be planted farther north. In commercial cultivation, apricots are grafted onto wild apricots or cherry plums; more rarely, they are grown from seeds. Trees are planted every 6–8 m in rows that are 8 m apart. The best shapes for the crown are the improved vase or the un-layered, on a trunk 50–80 cm high. Shoots cluttering the top of young and fast-growing trees are cut off. Long and thick year-old shoots that dangle from the sides are shortened by one-third to two-thirds. Fully grown and fruit-bearing trees are pruned every year. Apricot orchards are treated with organic and mineral fertilizers every three or four years in the following amounts (in kg of active substances per ha): phosphorus, 50–80, potassium, 10–15, and nitrogen, 30–50. In addition to fall and spring water-supply irrigation, apricot orchards in dry regions are treated with vegetation irrigation from two times a year (in the European part of the USSR) to six times a year (in Central Asia). The irrigation norm is 300–400 cubic m per ha for young orchards and 500–700 cubic m per ha for fruit-bearing orchards. Apricots are damaged by weevils and flatheaded borers and attacked by gray rot, clasteriosporium, and bacterial cancer.

REFERENCES

Kostina, K. F. Abrikos. Leningrad, 1936.
Shitt, P. G. Abrikos. Moscow, 1950.
Kovalev, N. V. Abrikos. Moscow, 1963.

apricot

[′ap·rə‚kät]
(botany)
Prunus armeniaca. A deciduous tree in the order Rosales which produces a simple fleshy stone fruit.

apricot

1. a rosaceous tree, Prunus armeniaca, native to Africa and W Asia, but widely cultivated for its edible fruit
2. the downy yellow juicy edible fruit of this tree, which resembles a small peach
References in periodicals archive ?
This 100 percent natural and FTNF (From the Named Food) clear distillate gives an authentic and well rounded apricot flavour to a variety of food and beverage applications.
That's when modern long-distance shipping began to require harder, more durable varieties, and the Blenheim--so named because it was thought to have emerged from the gardens of England's Blenheim Palace--began to fade from the market shelves, replaced by bigger, tougher, rosy-cheeked apricots that usually have about as much flavor as ice plant.
Where apricots are concerned, you cannot go wrong by selecting `Moorpark.
Drain and save the rum and add the apricots to the flour.
100g ready made puff pastry; 50g butter, softened; 50g caster sugar; 50g ground almonds; 1 medium egg; 1-2 caps cointreau; 8 fresh apricots; a little melted butter; icing sugar for sprinkling; a little apricot coulis (see Tip)
Apricots were first brought to the west by Spanish explorers who found them growing wild on the mountain slopes of China.
2 cups of any one: sliced and pitted plums, peaches, nectarines, or apricots (about 1 to 1 1/2 pounds of fruit) 1 jalapeno, seeded and mimed Juice of 1 lime (and zest if using organic lime) 1 cup silken tofu 4 cups peach or apricot nectar 1 to 1 1/2 cups chopped apricots, peeled and pitted peaches, nectarines, or halved cherries 1/4 cup cilantro for garnish Baked corn tortillas for serving
Stir in the yogurt; fold in the dates and apricots.
Go Big Orange - Orange fruits such as peaches, apricots and Mandarin oranges are a good source of Vitamin A, which has the potential to reduce the risk of cancer; may prevent cardiovascular disease; and may improve vision and reduce cataract formation.
Start by soaking the apricots in the port overnight.
AGE PROFILE of apricot consumers CHILDREN 0-16 11% MALE 17-44 4% 45+ 24% FEMALE 17-44 9% 45+ 52% Info: Usage overview of apricots.
Invert the pancake on a flat plate and rearrange apricots as necessary.