Apsu


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Apsu

primeval waters, origin of all things. [Babyl. Myth.: Leach, 68]

Apsu

personification of fresh water. [Babyl. Myth.: Benét, 4]
See: Water
References in periodicals archive ?
She is after all water, commingling in one body with Apsu.
When on high the heaven had not been named, Firm ground below had not been called by name, Naught but primordial Apsu, their begetter, And Mummu-Tiamat, she who bore them all, Their waters commingling as a single body; No reed hut had been matted, no marsh land had appeared, When no gods whatever had been brought into being, Uncalled by name, their destinies undetermined.
All that we find are Apsu and Tiamat, each with an epithet--'their begetter' and 'she who bore them all'.
Although she begins the process with Apsu, she occupies the place of undifferentiation, the only place left to her.
In 1986, the APSU Woodward Library User Education Program was formalized with the hiring of a user education librarian.
APSU librarians have already been asked to create course-specific resource Web pages and Web-based instructional units.
During April-May 2001, selected APSU faculty, including one of the Heritage communications professors, met with librarians in information literacy initiative meetings which grew out of an action plan the user education librarian developed during an ACRL Institute for Information Literacy Immersion Program.
Unfortunately, almost immediately upon completing his extraordinary transformation, Apsu goes to work attempting to undo that which was responsible for it: Disturbed by the clamor of his and Tiamat's divine children, he and his vizier plot to destroy them (Ee I 52).
Such a characterization of events proves immediately problematic, however: In failing to address Apsu's shifting nature within the text, it not only implies a quite unpalatable origin for the gods of Enuma elis as the descendents of a pair of monsters but also causes us to dismiss Apsu as just another monstrous enemy in a narrative riddled with such, blinding us to the more calculated implications of his role within the text.
In the account of his death and its immediate aftermath, then, Apsu is first put to sleep, and then stripped of his agu and his melammu, (14) with Ea taking the latter of these for himself prior to executing his forefather.
At the time, / after I had made the statue of Anshar, king of all the great gods, creator of himself, / father of the great gods, who had grown to physical maturity in Apsu .
Yet even while saying so, he reminds us that Ansar was actually self-created and had grown to maturity in Apsu.