Apulia

(redirected from Apulian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Apulia

(əpyo͞o`lēə), Ital. Puglia, region (1991 pop. 4,031,885), 7,469 sq mi (19,345 sq km), S Italy, bordering on the Adriatic Sea in the east and the Strait of Otranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south. Its southern portion, a peninsula, forms the heel of the Italian "boot." BariBari
, city (1991 pop. 342,309), capital of Bari prov. and of Apulia, S Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. It is a major seaport and an industrial and commercial center. It is connected by road, rail, and ship to other Adriatic ports and is now connected by road to Naples.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is the capital of the region, which is divided into Bari, Brindisi, Foggia, Lecce, and Taranto provs. (named for their capitals). Apulia is mostly a plain; its low coast, however, is broken by the mountainous Garagano Peninsula in the north, and there are mountains in the north central part of the region. Farming was the chief occupation, but industry has expanded rapidly. Farm products include olives, grapes, cereals, almonds, figs, tobacco, and livestock (sheep, pigs, cattle, and goats). Manufactures include refined petroleum, chemicals, cement, iron and steel, processed food, plastics, and wine. Fishing is pursued in the Adriatic and in the Gulf of Taranto. The scarcity of water has long been an acute problem in Apulia, and it is necessary to carry drinking water by aqueduct across the Apennines from the Sele River in Campania. In ancient times only the northern part of the region was called Apulia; the southern peninsula was known as Calabria, a name later used to designate the toe of the Italian boot. The region was settled by several Italic peoples and by Greek colonists before it was conquered (4th cent. B.C.) by Rome. After the fall of Rome, Apulia was held successively by the Goths, the Lombards, and the Byzantines. In the 11th cent. it was conquered by the Normans; Robert GuiscardRobert Guiscard
, c.1015–1085, Norman conqueror of S Italy, a son of Tancred de Hauteville (see Normans). Robert joined (c.1046) his brothers in S Italy and fought with them to expel the Byzantines.
..... Click the link for more information.
 set up the duchy of Apulia in 1059. After the Norman conquest of Sicily (late 11th cent.), Palermo replaced MelfiMelfi
, town (1991 pop. 15,757), in Basilicata, S Italy. It is an agricultural and tourist center noted for its wine. In 1041 it was made the first capital of the Norman county of Apulia. At Melfi Emperor Frederick II promulgated (c.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (just west of present-day Apulia) as the center of Norman power, and Apulia became a mere province, first of the kingdom of Sicily, then of the kingdom of Naples. From the late 12th to early 13th cent. Apulia was a favorite residence of the Hohenstaufen emperors, notably Frederick II. The coast later was occupied at times by the Turks and by the Venetians. In 1861 the region joined Italy. The feudal system long prevailed in the rural areas of Apulia; social and agrarian reforms proceeded slowly from the 19th cent. and accelerated in the mid-20th cent. The characteristic Apulian architecture of the 11th–13th cent. reflects Greek, Arab, Norman, and Pisan influences. There are universities at Bari and Lecce.

Apulia

a region of SE Italy, on the Adriatic. Capital: Bari. Pop.: 4 023 957 (2003 est.). Area: 19 223 sq. km (7422 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
39) The vase is Apulian, dated around the middle of the fourth century BC, supposedly a work coming from the atelier of the Darius Painter, the most prominent figure among Apulian vase painters of that period, who worked in Tarentum and to whom many Andromeda vases can also be ascribed.
Shop in Alberobello 9 Borgo Egnazia Bordering the ruins of the ancient city of Egnathia to the north, the fishing village of Savelletri to the south and surrounded by acres of stunning Apulian olive groves, this new resort is positioned to become the Mediterranean's leading spa, golf and family venues.
Since in our Apulian case we are dealing with closely related varieties, the null assumption is that they should not diverge on such an essential property as dominant alignment.
Primitivo, sometimes cited as a forerunner to zinfandel, can produce an awkward and intense wine under most common Apulian methods--high production in intense summer heat has yielded thick, stewed wines more reminiscent of basement-produced home-made jug wines than the racy zinfandels US drinkers are accustomed to.
In his mernoirs, Leonetti has described vividly the squalid conditions in his Apulian hometown of Andria, bursting from the influx of landless day-labourers from the countryside.
In early medieval times, it was a robust Lombard duchy that at its northern extreme stretched almost to Rome and in the south took in all but the Calabrian toe and Apulian heel of the peninsula.
Julia spent the last 20 years of her life on an Apulian islet, banished for her excesses.
Against the interpretation of these facts as fictional, archeological evidence shows that the association of the two figures had an antecedent in Apulian vases of the IV century BC.
The Camparino will continue to be managed by Orlando Chiari and Teresa Miani, respectively the son-in-law and daughter of Guglielmo Miani, the Apulian tailor who arrived in Milan in 1922 and who purchased the licence of the bar.
Who was buried at Canosa is also a complex question; a Celtic mercenary is one possibility or more likely the helmet with its later embellishment was a trophy of a local Apulian knight (Oliver 1968).
34) In particular, three late-eleventh-century Apulian arcosolia provide the key to reconstructing the probable appearance of most or all of the earliest Norman tombs in Southern Italy, created for members of the ennobled Hauteville (Altavilla) clan and their retinue prior to their assuming the mantle of royal dynasts, when as described above their tombs became far more grandiose and sumptuous.