Apulia

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Apulia

(əpyo͞o`lēə), Ital. Puglia, region (1991 pop. 4,031,885), 7,469 sq mi (19,345 sq km), S Italy, bordering on the Adriatic Sea in the east and the Strait of Otranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south. Its southern portion, a peninsula, forms the heel of the Italian "boot." BariBari
, city (1991 pop. 342,309), capital of Bari prov. and of Apulia, S Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. It is a major seaport and an industrial and commercial center. It is connected by road, rail, and ship to other Adriatic ports and is now connected by road to Naples.
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 is the capital of the region, which is divided into Bari, Brindisi, Foggia, Lecce, and Taranto provs. (named for their capitals). Apulia is mostly a plain; its low coast, however, is broken by the mountainous Garagano Peninsula in the north, and there are mountains in the north central part of the region. Farming was the chief occupation, but industry has expanded rapidly. Farm products include olives, grapes, cereals, almonds, figs, tobacco, and livestock (sheep, pigs, cattle, and goats). Manufactures include refined petroleum, chemicals, cement, iron and steel, processed food, plastics, and wine. Fishing is pursued in the Adriatic and in the Gulf of Taranto. The scarcity of water has long been an acute problem in Apulia, and it is necessary to carry drinking water by aqueduct across the Apennines from the Sele River in Campania. In ancient times only the northern part of the region was called Apulia; the southern peninsula was known as Calabria, a name later used to designate the toe of the Italian boot. The region was settled by several Italic peoples and by Greek colonists before it was conquered (4th cent. B.C.) by Rome. After the fall of Rome, Apulia was held successively by the Goths, the Lombards, and the Byzantines. In the 11th cent. it was conquered by the Normans; Robert GuiscardRobert Guiscard
, c.1015–1085, Norman conqueror of S Italy, a son of Tancred de Hauteville (see Normans). Robert joined (c.1046) his brothers in S Italy and fought with them to expel the Byzantines.
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 set up the duchy of Apulia in 1059. After the Norman conquest of Sicily (late 11th cent.), Palermo replaced MelfiMelfi
, town (1991 pop. 15,757), in Basilicata, S Italy. It is an agricultural and tourist center noted for its wine. In 1041 it was made the first capital of the Norman county of Apulia. At Melfi Emperor Frederick II promulgated (c.
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 (just west of present-day Apulia) as the center of Norman power, and Apulia became a mere province, first of the kingdom of Sicily, then of the kingdom of Naples. From the late 12th to early 13th cent. Apulia was a favorite residence of the Hohenstaufen emperors, notably Frederick II. The coast later was occupied at times by the Turks and by the Venetians. In 1861 the region joined Italy. The feudal system long prevailed in the rural areas of Apulia; social and agrarian reforms proceeded slowly from the 19th cent. and accelerated in the mid-20th cent. The characteristic Apulian architecture of the 11th–13th cent. reflects Greek, Arab, Norman, and Pisan influences. There are universities at Bari and Lecce.

Apulia

a region of SE Italy, on the Adriatic. Capital: Bari. Pop.: 4 023 957 (2003 est.). Area: 19 223 sq. km (7422 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
The case of Andromeda in Apulian vases is emblematic in this sense.
44) While the eggs on the Apulian vase symbolize new life, the dog and the kantharos on the column are signifiers of a ritual centered around death.
The policy platform he presented in the Apulian regional elections is representative of this effort.
Effects of the edible sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus, fishery along the Apulian rocky coast (SE Italy, Mediterranean Sea).
Could all the wounded troops again assemble:/ first from Apulia, land laid low by war,/ who grieved for their lost blood/shed by the Trojans, then all those/ of the long war, whose corpses were despoiled/of piles of rings--as Livy writes, who does not err--/ together with the ones who felt the agony of blows/ fighting in the fields against Guiscard,/ and those whose bones still lie in heaps/ at Ceperano, where each Apulian played it false,/ and those near Tagliacozzo,/ where old Alardo conquered without force of arms/ and should one show his limb pierced through,/ another his, where it has been cut off,/ it would be nothing to the ninth pit's filth.
1 UNESCO World Heritage Sites Puglia boasts a number of World Heritage sites: Castel del Monte, near the city of Bari, built by Emperor Frederick II in the 13th century is a unique piece of medieval military architecture, offering stunning views of the Apulian countryside.
Another Apulian example executed by the Haverford Painter, now Naples 2013, shows an ecstatic maenad holding a dagger in one hand and a still untouched animal in her left.
Contemporary reports that Scott refers to, but does not quote, confirm and even further spell out what we see in the Prayer Book illuminations: in 1447 Alfonso paid 745 ducats for a piece of gold brocade, more than forty-two times what an Apulian laborer would earn in a year
2001 "Analysis of the Looting, Selling and Collecting of Apulian Red-Figure Vases: A Quantitative Approach.
In key ways local Apulian priorities structure his remarks.
In many dialects of Italy, free variation of aux E/H is also found, as illustrated in (16) with data from the Apulian variety of Altamura (Bari province): (Data are limited to 1st and 2nd persons for reasons that will become apparent below; cf.