aquifer

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aquifer

(ăk`wĭfər): see artesian wellartesian well,
deep drilled well through which water is forced upward under pressure. The water in an artesian well flows from an aquifer, which is a layer of very porous rock or sediment, usually sandstone, capable of holding and transmitting large quantities of water.
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; water supplywater supply,
process or activity by which water is provided for some use, e.g., to a home, factory, or business. The term may also refer to the supply of water provided in this way.
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Aquifer

Any underground water-bearing rock formation or group of formations that supplies groundwater, wells, or springs.

Aquifer

 

a stratum or several strata of water-permeable rock, whose pores, cracks, or other cavities are filled with groundwater. Several aquifers hydraulically connected to each other form an aquifer complex.

aquifer

[′ak·wə·fər]
(geology)
A permeable body of rock capable of yielding quantities of groundwater to wells and springs.
(hydrology)
A subsurface zone that yields economically important amounts of water to wells.

aquifer

A water-bearing formation of gravel, permeable rock, or sand that is capable of providing water, in usable quantities, to springs or wells.

aquifer

a porous deposit of rock, such as a sandstone, containing water that can be used to supply wells
References in periodicals archive ?
The first aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for the people of Thar, which is not being dewatered during the mining operations, he said and added that the depressurizing water ranges salinity from 4000 to 5000 ppm.
NASA gathered its data using special satellites called Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites, which took precise measurements of the world's groundwater aquifers.
Generally speaking, supporters of aquifer storage and recovery say the approach has many advantages over traditional methods of water storage such as surface reservoirs.
Reducing flows from aquifers to these surface waters, if great enough, can result in adverse ecological effects.
On the other hand, the legal characterization of groundwater or aquifers as shared resources is recent and controversial.
Many of the highly stressed aquifers are located in poorer nations--the Central Valley Aquifer in California is the exception.
Sandra Postel wrote here last month that the Ogallala Aquifer water level in the Texas Panhandle has dropped by up to 15 feet in the past decade, with more than three-quarters of that loss having come during the drought of the past five years.
In parts of the southern USA and Mexico, the overuse of water from aquifers can have dramatic physical consequences.
The cancer threat posed by the aquifers is a staggering blow to the long-term economic and social prospects of the Middle East whose rapidly growing populations comprise 5% of humanity while holding only 0.
At present, two-thirds of Mexico City's water is drawn from its overexploited aquifers, including the Texcoco aquifer, and the remainder is imported from outlying river basins.
Though 80 percent of the world's aquifers (blue on map) have sustainable footprints, people drawing on others (red, orange and yellow) are draining the world's water supply.
Transmmissivity is widely employed in groundwater hydraulics; it is known to be the rate at which water of a prevailing kinematics viscosity is transmitted through a unit width of aquifer under a unit hydraulic gradient.