Aquitanian


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Aquitanian

[‚ak·wə′tān·ē·ən]
(geology)
Lower lower Miocene or uppermost Oligocene geologic time.
References in periodicals archive ?
From that exchange of opinions about the Aquitanian polyphonic repertory I should like to identify those essays most fundamental to an understanding of Theodore Karp's approach in his imposing The Polyphony of Saint Martial and Santiago de Compostela.
The earlier Zamoran sources use Aquitanian notation similar to but not identical with the "classical style" of Paris, Bibliotheque national latin 903.
17) See Charlotte Diane Roederer, "Eleventh-century Aquitanian Chant: Studies Relating to a Local Repertory of Processional Antiphons," 2 vols.
96, PIXV/3-6 Material - 2 Samples Distribution - Aquitanian of Eidajti and Shurab.
In 1995, after the initial joint acquisition with Notre Dame, Theodore Karp, a distinguished Midwestern musicologist at an institution not yet a Newberry partner, brought to the Newberry's attention a liturgical codex copied in about 1300 that contained a rare example of Aquitanian neumatic notation, a form of musical notation that antedated the square notation customarily found in late medieval manuscripts and early printed tomes.
Leglu begins by discussing evidence for clerical parody, from the relationship between tropes and versus of the Aquitanian corpus and early troubadour vers to Peire de Corbiac's Thezaur which makes an explicit link between church singing and vernacular material.
Consider their language: Kurlansky mentions the fact that it is an agglutinative language, similar to Finnish and Hungarian, but he doesn't seem to be aware of the most recent determinations, namely, that Basque is a vestige of the language of the Aquitanian people, the last pre-Indo European language group to survive in the area extending from the Pyrcnecs to the Garonne and on down to present-day Navarre.
This is not trivial criticism, because bilingualism is the prerequisite for language-shift, a phenomenon which has occurred on a massive scale not only in modern times, for example in Ireland, but also in antiquity, for example in France where Aquitanian, Gaulish and Frankish were all replaced by the form of Latin which became French.
5 meters thick, involving gypsiferous white beds which lack fossils, and its age is considered as Aquitanian from Early Miocene due to its stratigraphic situation [1,4,7] (B) The calcareous member (88 m), whose bottom-up lithologic specifications are as follows:
Second, the pieces themselves are placed in the context of her contemporaries' work: her compositions are interspersed with songs by Peter Abelard (the Biblical plaint Planctus David super Saul et Ionatha and the hymn O Quanta Qualia) and a selection of anonymously composed examples of early Aquitanian polyphony taken from the St.
The palaeographic style of the text, and the style of the music notation, indicate different geographic origins; one is notated in Messine notation, and the other in Aquitanian notation.
Mdina (Malta), Cathedral Museum, A [Antiphoner, twelfth century, unknown church, written in Aquitanian notation].