Arabic Script

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Arabic Script

 

a system of writing used by Arabs and Muslim peoples (Iranians, Afghans, Pakistanis, the Sinkiang Uighurs, and others).

Arabic script was used by the Turks in Turkey until 1929 and by some peoples of the USSR—for example, in Middle Asia, Azerbaijan, and Dagestan—until the late 1920’s and early 1930’s. It originated from the Aramaic script; the Nemarah inscription of A.D. 328 and the Zabid inscription of A.D. 512 are the oldest. Arabic script was spread by Arab conquests and by the expansion of Islam. The modern Arabic alphabet has 28 characters. (Other peoples who use the script add some of their own.) Each character has two to fourforms that are used according to whether the letter stands by itself, at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a word. The script consists mostly of consonants. Long vowels are designated by the letters waw (w), ya (y), and alif (’). The short vowels, normally not indicated in writing, can be shown by strokes placed over or under a letter. Arabic is written from right to left.

References in periodicals archive ?
To overcome this difficulty, Effendi manipulated the Arabic alphabet and vowel indicator system (Davids 1991b: 6).
We begin by learning the Alif, the first letter of the Arabic alphabet.
5 million in Afghanistan, it is written in the Arabic alphabet and dates from the first millennium B.
Ruling much of what is now Iraq, Syria, and Kuwait, the influence of Lakhmid culture was widespread--even to the degree that the Lakhmid capital, Hira, was where the Arabic alphabet was first standardized.
After that, under the influence of Islamic religion, the Kurdish language was obliged to be written in the Arabic alphabet.
Bilbeisi's exhibition consists of enlarged letters from the Arabic alphabet and Qur'anic sentences that lighten up the walls of the gallery.
They begin by learning the Arabic alphabet before progressing to being able to read the entire Koran by the age of 12 or 13.
I learned from this beautiful book - the first on Islamic calligraphy that I have reviewed for these columns - that the Turks adopted the Arabic alphabet after their conversion to Islam in the 10th century.
The mints in the two junds of Filastin and al-Urdunn are presented in alphabetical order according to the Arabic alphabet.
In August 2014, a report claimed that a Saudi-French archaeological team has unearthed in Najran what might be considered the oldest inscription in the Arabic alphabet.
The museum's name, Mim, was inspired by the 24th letter in the Arabic alphabet, also found in the Latin alphabet.
Until 1934, both Arabic and Farsi were forbidden, and with the removal of the Arabic alphabet, even just reading the common history of those geographies became impossible.