Araceae


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Related to Araceae: Arecaceae, Alismatales

Araceae

[ə′rās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of herbaceous flowering plants in the order Arales; plants have stems, roots, and leaves, the inflorescence is a spadix, and the growth habit is terrestrial or sometimes more or less aquatic; well-known members include dumb cane (Dieffenbachia), jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema), and Philodendron.

Araceae

 

a family of monocotyledonous plants. They are grassy perennials, often with thickened rhizomes or tubers; also climbing shrubs or semishrubs; and occasionally dendroid forms or epiphytes. The flowers are bisexual or unisexual in the spadices, with a bright covering. There are about 110 genera and 2,000 species, mainly in tropical regions. There are seven genera and 14 species in the USSR. Many Araceae contain a milky sap that is often poisonous. Among the Araceae are the taro, alocasias, and the yautia (Xanthosoma), which are important food crops; and also the anthuriums, monsteras, philodendrons, Indian kale, and others, which are widespread hothouse and house plants. In the USSR the bog arum grows in swampy areas, and the cuckoo pint is found in shady forests. Some species of Araceae (for example, plants of the genus Acora) are used in medicine and in the manufacture of perfume.

REFERENCE

Kuzeneva, O. I. “Aroidnye.” In Flora SSSR, vol. 3. Leningrad, 1935.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thrips damage on ornamental Araceae was also reported for Chaetanaphothrips orchidii on anthurium and Echinothrips americanus on dieffenbachia and syngonium (see Hara et al.
Strelitziaceae]) in forest in Belem, State of Para, Brazil (Motta & Lourenco de Oliveira 2000) and also in Heliconia and Araceae (Dieffenbachia sp.
Flower structure and development of Araceae compared with alismatids and Acoraceae.
Based on studies in Syngonium (Araceae), Ray (1987) clearly described the so-called cyclic heterophylly as a differential development on distinct vegetative growth cycles; later, the same author (1990) refined this concept based on the examination of other Araceae, and described it as a "metamorphosis", which clearly differentiates first order from higher orders of development during leaf morphogenesis.
Macerated cells can also be studied with SEM, and in some families such as Araceae (Carlquist & Schneider, 1998; Schneider & Carlquist, 1998) primary and secondary walls seem relatively unaffected by the maceration process.
Plants belonging to families Acanthaceae, Apocynaceae, Amaryllidaceae, Angelicae, Araceae, Asclepiadaceae, Berberidaceae, Buxaceae, Combretaceae, Compositae, Coniferae, Cyperaceae, Ebenaceae, Ericaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fumariaceae, Gentianaceae, Guttiferae, Lamiaceae, Leguminosae, Lilliaceae, Lycopodiaceae, Malvaceae, Magnoliaceae, Menispermaceae, Mollugi-naceae, Moraceae, Musaceae, Nelumbonaceae, Papaveraceae, Piperaceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae, Sapotaceae, Solanaceae and Tamaricaceae have been reported to have AChE inhibitory potential.
18 Aquifoliaceae Ilex cymosa 19 Araceae Aglaeonema minus 20 Aglaeonema simplex 21 Pistia stratiotes 22 Araliaceae Schefflera avensis (Miq.
Next come 14 chapters on plants They begin with an overview and follow with chapters on Briophyta (mosses, 3 chapters), Araceae (aroids), Smilax (Smilacaceae), Agavaceae, Orchidaceae (orchids), Bromeliaceae (bromeliads), mistletoes (Loranthaceae, Viscaceae, and Eremolepidaceae), Phaseolus (Leguminosae), Cactaceae (cactus), Asclepiadaceae, and Solanaceae.
Families represented by a single species are the Alismataceae, Araceae, Cabombaceae, Juncaceae, Lamiaceae, Najadaceae, Rubiaceae, Saururaceae, Sparganiaceae, Typhaceae, and Zannichelliaceae.
The Araceae and the Solanaceae families were the major contributors with three plants per family.
Other important families included the Acanthaceae, Amaranthaceae, Araceae, Combretaceae, and the Vitaceae family.
The study found the most root pressure in the Bignoniaceae, Araceae, Leguminosae, and Vitaceae families, while finding root pressures absent in the Passifloraceae, Aristolochiaceae, and Malpighiaceae families (Fisher et al.