Araguaía

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Related to Araguaia River: Tocantins River, Amazon River, Paraguay River

Araguaía

(ärägwī`ə), river, c.1,600 mi (2,575 km) long, rising in the Serra des Araras, at the border of Goiás and Mato Grosso states, S central Brazil. It flows generally northward into the Tocantins River, forming most of the border between Goiás and the states of Mato Grosso and Pará. Diamonds are washed along its upper tributaries. There are numerous falls on the Araguaía. The island of Bananal (c.200 mi/320 km long; 35 mi/56 km wide), separating the river into two arms, is one of the largest freshwater islands in the world. It is also a national park. The Araguaía region has been made accessible by new highways. The Brazilians have constructed hydroelectric projects along the Araguaía.

Araguaia

, Araguaya
a river in central Brazil, rising in S central Mato Grosso state and flowing north to the Tocantins River. Length: over 1771 km (1100 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Water samples were collected from areas of the Araguaia River where case-patients reportedly swam.
Environmental exposures most strongly associated with increased risk for disease, which was significant when compared with both household and community controls (Table 2), were swimming or diving in the Araguaia River and frequenting Cais beach on the bank of the Araguaia River.
We educated the population about risks for eye contact with river water; active searches were conducted to identify all ill persons in the population and in neighboring cities, and health officials limited recreational access to the Araguaia River.
Such tactics continued in subsequent years: in 1907, settlers wiped out a Bororo village on the Araguaia River, killing some eighty Indians.
de Freitas (1914), the region between the sources of the Madeira river, Lake Titicaca, Beni and Araguaia rivers (critique in Baldus 1954: 251-2); Rodolfo Garcia (1922, based on Ehrenreich), the region between the Paraguay and Parana river basins; Fritz Krause (1925), the area of the Omagua and Kokama, between the Napo and Jurua rivers.