Aragvi

Aragvi

 

a river in eastern Georgia; left tributary of the Kura. Formed near the settlement of Pasanauri by the confluence of the Belaia and the Chernaia Aragvi rivers, which rise on the southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus. Length, 66 km; basin area, 2,740 sq km. Fed by a mixture of sources. It is used for irrigation. The Georgian Military Road runs along the river valley. The city of Mtskheta is located on the Aragvi at its confluence with the Kura.

References in periodicals archive ?
A short drive north of the capital at the confluence of the Aragvi river brings one to Mtskheta, the spiritual heart of Georgia since Christianity was established.
Currently, Voith subsidiary Kssler is equipping the Mestiachala 1 & 2 power plants in the Mestia mountain region for an output of more than 50 MW and is fitting electrical and mechanical components to the small Aragvi II power plant in the north-east of the country.
The most vibrant manifestation of this was the 1940 opening of the Aragvi Restaurant in Moscow, and the subject of one of the book's brightest moments.
The historically significant shrine of Sveti Tschoveli in Mtskheta is situated at the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, about 20 minutes northwest of Tbilisi.
Major organization : ARAGVI HOLDING INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
The Aragvi Restaurant (Georgian) was one in a number of culinary hotspots in Moscow--including the Uzbekistan--that highlighted the USSR's national cuisines and served as important contact points for interrepublican networks.
In a Soviet-era joke, two Georgians walk out of the Aragvi, the Soviet Union's most famous Georgian restaurant, located in the very center of Moscow.
The Aragvi was both a place for the new Soviet elite to engage in ideologically sanctioned conspicuous consumption and an ideal location for private meetings.
Moreover, when it opened, there were only a handful of restaurants operating in the capital, and the Aragvi was one of the few places members of the arriviste elite could enjoy the fruits of their labor for the Party while articulating their new social position through the cultivation of appropriately sophisticated tastes.
40) Moreover, Moscow's demand for Georgian food was eagerly met by Georgian culinary experts who soon took up work at the Aragvi.
The Aragvi led the way in the rapid development of the Soviet Union's multiethnic restaurant culture after World War II.
The Aragvi accordingly survived the death of Stalin and the wave of de-Stalinization that followed, though not without major changes in its management.