Aramaeans

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Aramaeans

 

nomadic Semitic tribes whose native land was the Arabian Peninsula. First mention of the Aramaeans dates from the middle of the third millennium B.C. In the 14th century B.C., the Aramaeans penetrated into the Syrian Desert as well as the central Euphrates region; by the turn of the 11th century B.C., they had overrun almost all of Southwest Asia. In a number of places (for example, to the East of the Jordan River), the Aramaeans became a settled people. By 1 A.D., Aramaic, which belongs to the Semitic group, had become the major spoken language of Southwest Asia. The descendants of the Aramaeans are the present-day Assyrians (Aisors).

REFERENCES

D’iakonov, I. M. “Narody drevnei Perednei Azii.” In Peredneaziatskii etnograficheskii sb., book 1. Moscow, 1958.
Dupont-Sommer, A. Les Araméens. Paris, [1949].
References in periodicals archive ?
As for personnel, the men of Israel had indeed been greatly outnumbered by those of Aram-Damascus in Aramaean Wars I and II.
Chapter 8 gives an overview of the Aramaean kingdoms west of the Euphrates: Bit-Agusi, Bit-Adini, Sam'al, Damascus, the mysterious KTK, and Soba.
The substantial number of Persians and persianized Aramaeans who convened to Islam had, however, varied economic backgrounds.
In sections on place, daily practice, and power, they consider such topics as movement across the landscape and residential stability in the southern Levantine Early Bronze Age; subsistence actions at Catalhoyuk; the practice of decorating Late Neolithic pottery in northern Mesopotamia; whether early Islamic pottery indicates a revolution in diet and dining habits; Assyrians, Aramaeans, and the indigenous peoples of Iron Age southeastern Anatolia; and the Hittite state.
In addition, the center will keep a record of the music of minorities in Muslim countries, in addition to special programs dedicated to the musical heritage of Assyrians, Aramaeans and Arab Christians.
And he [Ahaziah] went with Joram ben-Ahab to war with Hazael, King of Aram, at Ramoth-gilead, and the Aramaeans smote Joram.
Weigl (eds) The World of the Aramaeans II: Studies in History and Archaeology in Honour of Paul-Eugen Dion: 257-69.
Morrow, "The Sefire Treaty Stipulations and the Meso-potamian Treaty Tradition," in The World of the Aramaeans III: Studies in Language and Literature in Honour of Paul-Eugene Dion, ed.
I wonder if he did not intend the sun god Malakbel, venerated in the caravan city of Palmyra, whose pantheon incorporated Babylonian and Syro-Palestinian elements, and whose population consisted of Amoriles, Aramaeans, and Arabs.
A specially interesting case is Aram' < *' aram (like Arabic' af'al), which the author sees as internal plural of ri'm 'wild bull,' "the totem of Aramaeans.
Rollig, "Asia Minor as a Bridge between East and West: The Role of the Phoenicians and Aramaeans in the Transfer of Culture," in Greece between East and West: 10th-8th Centuries BC, ed.
The author organizes his material by ethnic groups and treats Libyans, Phoenicians, Aramaeans, Persians, Carians, Arabs, and Greeks, and concludes with some general remarks.