Aramaeans


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Related to Aramaeans: Cambyses, Nabonidus

Aramaeans

 

nomadic Semitic tribes whose native land was the Arabian Peninsula. First mention of the Aramaeans dates from the middle of the third millennium B.C. In the 14th century B.C., the Aramaeans penetrated into the Syrian Desert as well as the central Euphrates region; by the turn of the 11th century B.C., they had overrun almost all of Southwest Asia. In a number of places (for example, to the East of the Jordan River), the Aramaeans became a settled people. By 1 A.D., Aramaic, which belongs to the Semitic group, had become the major spoken language of Southwest Asia. The descendants of the Aramaeans are the present-day Assyrians (Aisors).

REFERENCES

D’iakonov, I. M. “Narody drevnei Perednei Azii.” In Peredneaziatskii etnograficheskii sb., book 1. Moscow, 1958.
Dupont-Sommer, A. Les Araméens. Paris, [1949].
References in periodicals archive ?
To demonstrate the social fusion and to facilitate the administration of the Caliphate, the Abbasids employed a great number of Persians and persianized Aramaeans in the bureaucracy.
But King Joram returned to Jezreel to be healed of his wounds that the Aramaeans had given him when he fought with Hazael, the King of Aram (9:14; cf.
As a result of the Aramaean siege and subsequent destruction, Safi/Gath lost prominence in the region.
The World of the Aramaeans, II: Studies in History and Archaeology in Honour of Paul-Eugene Dion.
Morrow, "The Sefire Treaty Stipulations and the Meso-potamian Treaty Tradition," in The World of the Aramaeans III: Studies in Language and Literature in Honour of Paul-Eugene Dion, ed.
In sections on place, daily practice, and power, they consider such topics as movement across the landscape and residential stability in the southern Levantine Early Bronze Age; subsistence actions at Catalhoyuk; the practice of decorating Late Neolithic pottery in northern Mesopotamia; whether early Islamic pottery indicates a revolution in diet and dining habits; Assyrians, Aramaeans, and the indigenous peoples of Iron Age southeastern Anatolia; and the Hittite state.
Masetti-Rouault briefly introduces the difficulties that have beset studies of the beginning of the Iron Age in the Middle Euphrates region, a time when many of the powers of the preceding Late Bronze Age (the Hittite empire, the Mitannian kingdom, the Egyptian New Kingdom, and the Middle Assyrian kingdom) were eclipsed and the Aramaeans were entering the historical scene throughout the Levant and across north Mesopotamia.
in Syria: The Problem of the Rise of the Aramaeans," and Thomas L.