Aransas National Wildlife Refuge


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Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

Address:PO Box 100
Austwell, TX 77950

Phone:361-286-3559
Fax:361-286-3722
Web: www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/texas/aransas.html
Established: 1937.
Location:Northeast of Corpus Christi.
Facilities:Visitor center, observation tower, hiking trails, auto tour route (16 miles), picnic area with bathroom, boardwalk, photography blind.
Activities:Fishing, hiking, hunting, biking, canoeing, kayaking, educational programs.
Special Features:More than 392 species of birds have been seen in Aransas NWR, which is home to the largest wild flock of whooping cranes each winter.
Habitats: More than115,000 acres of low-lying coastal land and barrier island, covered with grasslands, wetlands, and woodlands.
Access: Open sunrise to sunset.
Wild life: Whooping cranes and other migratory birds, butterflies, American alligator, armadillo, shrews, bats, wild boar, white-tailed deer.

See other parks in Texas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mitchell was recognized as a successful and responsible energy producer, a leader in restoring and preserving his hometown of Galveston, an active participant in creating a habitat for the endangered whooping crane near the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and founder of The Woodlands, an environmentally planned community north of Houston.
The birds winter at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and adjacent areas on the Texas Gulf Coast and nest in Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada's Northwest Territories.
Located 75 miles northeast of Corpus Christi, it skirts the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, and could serve as prime habitat for endangered whooping cranes that have been the subject of a controversial water policy lawsuit.
The last wild, self-sustaining population of Whooping Cranes, the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population (AWBP), migrates more than 3,800 km from Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada, to in and around Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Texas, USA, and has rebounded from fewer than 20 individuals in the early 1940s (Allen 1952) to over 250 individuals in 2011-2012 (Strobel et al.
By 1941, only 21 remained in the world--six in a non-migratory population at White Lake in Louisiana and 15 at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas.
One flight corridor for whooping cranes runs from western Canada to the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas.
Shaw, et al, explained their efforts in trying to connect fresh water supply to whooping crane mortality in the Aransas-Wood Buffalo whooping crane flock that winters at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.
We thank Chad Stinson of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge complex for helpful information about the distribution of gray fox in coastal Texas.
The recovery strategy includes protecting the bird's breeding, wintering, and migration habitat; protecting and facilitating the growth of the current wild population that migrates from Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada to Aransas National Wildlife Refuge on the Texas coast; establishing two additional self-sustaining populations of whooping cranes in the wild; and maintaining a genetically healthy captive population.
The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, located on the confluence of these two rivers at San Antonio Bay, lies on the central neotropical migration path for hundreds of species of birds, including the world's largest existing flock of endangered whooping cranes.
In 1937, the United States set aside Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas to protect the cranes, wintering grounds.
That same year, the federal Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, a 55,000-acre salt marsh habitat, was created by President Franklin Roosevelt to provide a last stand for the birds, which can grow to be four-and-a-half feet high with a seven-foot wingspan.