Arbaces


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Arbaces

priest who frames Glaucus. [Br. Lit.: The Last Days of Pompeii, Magill I, 490–492]
See: Deceit
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
22) Arbaces has therefore assembled the populace not only to meet them in triumph, but to present to them a reconciled Tigranes.
A jostling fight breaks out and an adulterous assignation is contemplated; such is the moral and intellectual makeup of the crowd to whom Arbaces speaks.
Tigranes blames Arbaces for this "speech in commendations of himself," calling him "vainglorious" (III.
But Mardonius does not interpret Arbaces as he would a true king; he interprets him as he would a generic, and specifically, a tragic king.
The last two members of the cast were castrati: Peretti making his first appearance on an English stage as Artaxerxes and Tenducci as Arbaces, son of Artabanes.
He exchanges swords with his son Arbaces (Tenducci) in a dastardly attempt to pin the regicide on him.
This raises the question of whether the character holding the bloody dagger/sword is Artabanes (Beard), who has killed Xerxes off stage, or Arbaces, the castrato who has unwittingly received the incriminating dagger.
The courtier Gobrius has crucial information, which is that Arbaces is his son, and not the legitimate king, and so his love for his supposed sister is not incestuous.
In the play, Mardonius stands in a critical relationship to both the absolutist King Arbaces of the upper plot and the cowardly, pandering Bessus of the lower.
Political discourse is added to sexual discourse in the third chapter, "Representing Authority," which traces the emergence of presiding authority figures in the persons of Gower in Pericles, Gobrius and Arbaces in A King and No King, and Prospero in The Tempest.
Arbaces was one of two roles originally sung by castrati, but in the happy disappearance of that curious phenomenon, this part is now well sung by a mezzo-soprano, Patricia Spence.
How the gender-specific demands of drama actually allow the play to overcome the incestuous entanglements of such nuptial rhetoric--the paradoxes by which Arbaces can end up both subject to and a member of the landowning gentry, by which his power can both emanate from and efface Panthea's--thus becomes, like its pendant frontispiece, a coup-de-theatre of diplomatic mediation, and a political etiology of tragicomic miracle itself.