Archimago


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Archimago

uses sorcery to deceive people. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Deceit

Archimago

enchanter epitomizing wickedness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Evil

Archimago

enchanter, disguised as hermit, wins confidence of Knight. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the very first canto of Book I, readers are confronted with the allegorical monster, Errour, and a Catholic hermit who reveals himself to be the evil sorcerer, Archimago.
Her first appearance occurs shortly after Archimago breaks the Redcrosse Knight away from Una-- Duessa's opposite in Book I and an allegorical personification of the Protestant faith--with an illusion that leads him to abandon her and quest forth on his own into the wilderness.
In Book II, Spenser places Duessa in alliance with Archimago in an attempt to lead Guyon into battle with the Redcrosse Knight.
9) Therefore, when Redcrosse emerges from a period of spiritual hibernation through the influence of the enchanter Archimago to fight Sans Foy ('Faithless'), the poem relates, "the sleeping spark/Of natiue vertue gan eftsoones reuiue" (I.
Spenser's description of Archimago as one who "could file his tongue as smooth as glas" [I.
In addition, in Hind Dryden alludes to and reworks Spenser's Monster Error, Duessa, and Archimago.
The study begins with Book I of The Faerie Queene, in which, Tiffany contends, pilgrimage poses an irresolvable interpretative problem--on the one hand, the poem repudiates the vestiges of Catholic pilgrimage in its depictions of Archimago and Duessa, replacing them with the Protestant journey inward of Redcrosse Knight that culminates in the House of Holiness; on the other, the book ends with Redcrosse's "profane" journey outward to Cleopolis (London), which allegorically becomes a shrine to Elizabeth I's worldly power, thus pilgrimage becomes an "imperial endeavor" (66).
Spenser's Archimago helps us to understand better Iago, even though
with Una because the disguised, and newly met, tempter Archimago used
Ironically the quotation (proposed by one of those hungry visitors, and accepted by Thoreau as the "motto of my cabin") is a description of Redcross and Una's visit to a monk's hermitage in The Faerie Queene I--and the monk is the villainous Archimago in disguise.
the evil magician Archimago first appears as an "aged Sire" (I
In Archimago -- Spenser's "dark double," in the editors' phrase -- Quint locates a parodic and prophetic link to the poem's subsequent narrative as well to the literary and historical antecedents that The Faerie Queene feeds on and disguises.