Archimedes' screw


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Archimedes' screw,

a simple mechanical device believed to have been invented by Archimedes in the 3d cent. B.C. It consists of a cylinder inside of which a continuous screw, extending the length of the cylinder, forms a spiral chamber. By placing the lower end in water and revolving the screw, water is raised to the top. The principle is applied in machines used for drainage and irrigation, and also in some types of high-speed tools. It can also be applied for handling light, loose materials such as grain, sand, and ashes.

Archimedes' screw

[¦är·kə¦mēd‚ēz ′skrü]
(mechanical engineering)
A device for raising water by means of a rotating broad-threaded screw or spirally bent tube within an inclined hollow cylinder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout UK there are streams, rivers, disused mill streams that could, and should, be investigated for the production of electrical power by using old technology, waterwheels, Archimedes' screws and turbines.
Despite the Archimedes' screw being an ancient concept, there is still no better way of moving' unscreened sewage and flood waters over short distances" says Jamie Wesley, engineering contracts manager at Deritend Industries, the plant equipment and maintenance firm that has handled many of these types of installations.
The design of the Archimedes' screw is beautifully simple, comprising in the main a large, hollow steel pipe.
The beatings used on Archimedes' screws have also improved dramatically.
Now manufacturers of Archimedes' screws such as the Netherlands-based firm Landustrie are far more likely to supply the unit pre-loaded in a steel enclosure and factory-set to achieve optimal efficiency.
PICTURESQUE: The weir at Aspley Picture by Peter Cottle (PC061008Cweir); OLD PRINCIPLE, NEW USE: A modern Archimedes' screw in a pumping station in The Netherlands Picture by M.
Then there's the dolphin sanctuary and a well-thought-out water park for children (and some soggy dads) involving dams, Archimedes' screws and various aquatic gadgets which kept us all amused for some time.
What's most unique about the Tees Barrage course is that it will be powered totally by the River Tees, with two giant Archimedes' Screws recycling the water uphill to generate the rapids and whirlpools.