Archimedes' problem

Archimedes' problem

[¦är·kə¦mēd‚ēz ′präb·ləm]
(mathematics)
The problem of dividing a hemisphere into two parts of equal volume with a plane parallel to the base of the hemisphere; it cannot be solved by Euclidean methods.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mathematics: ABEGG'S RULE, ABEL'S THEOREM, ARCHIMEDES' PROBLEM, BERNOULLI'S THEOREM, DE MOIVRE'S THEOREM, DE MORGAN'S THEOREM, DESARGUES' THEOREM, DESCARTES' RULE OF SIGNS, EUCLID'S ALGORITHM, EULER'S EQUATION/FORMULA, FERMAT'S PRINCIPLE, FOURIER'S THEOREM, GAUSS'S THEOREM, GOLDBACH'S CONJECTURE, HUDDE'S RULES, LAPLACE'S EQUATIONS, NEWTON'S METHOD/PARALLELOGRAM, PASCAL'S LAW/TRIANGLE, RIEMANN'S HYPOTHESIS
Before general solutions of cubic equations were known, Archimedes' problem was the subject of study and research because the problem required solving a cubic equation.
The technique has been applied to constructions of Khayyyam's problem, regular monagons, regular heptagon, cube duplication, and Archimedes' problem.