Archimedes' screw


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Archimedes' screw,

a simple mechanical device believed to have been invented by Archimedes in the 3d cent. B.C. It consists of a cylinder inside of which a continuous screw, extending the length of the cylinder, forms a spiral chamber. By placing the lower end in water and revolving the screw, water is raised to the top. The principle is applied in machines used for drainage and irrigation, and also in some types of high-speed tools. It can also be applied for handling light, loose materials such as grain, sand, and ashes.

Archimedes' screw

[¦är·kə¦mēd‚ēz ′skrü]
(mechanical engineering)
A device for raising water by means of a rotating broad-threaded screw or spirally bent tube within an inclined hollow cylinder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout UK there are streams, rivers, disused mill streams that could, and should, be investigated for the production of electrical power by using old technology, waterwheels, Archimedes' screws and turbines.
PICTURESQUE: The weir at Aspley Picture by Peter Cottle (PC061008Cweir); OLD PRINCIPLE, NEW USE: A modern Archimedes' screw in a pumping station in The Netherlands Picture by M.
2-acre scheme includes an Archimedes' Screw mill harnessing the river's energy.
It will use a modern version of the Archimedes' Screw to harness water power using a water wheel installed on the weir.