archive

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archive

Computing data transferred to a tape or disk for long-term storage rather than frequent use

archive

(file format)
A single file containing one or (usually) more separate files plus information to allow them to be extracted (separated) by a suitable program.

Archives are usually created for software distribution or backup. tar is a common format for Unix archives, and arc or PKZIP for MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows.

archive

(operating system)
To transfer files to slower, cheaper media (usually magnetic tape) to free the hard disk space they occupied. This is now normally done for long-term storage but in the 1960s, when disk was much more expensive, files were often shuffled regularly between disk and tape.

archive

(networking)

archive

(1) (noun) A file that contains one or more compressed files. Most archive formats are also capable of storing folder structures in order to reconstruct the file/folder relationship when decompressed.

One File Is Easier to Distribute
More often than not, archives are used to combine several files into one for ease of distribution. Although the compression algorithm may reduce all the files by a substantial amount, the size reduction is often less important than the convenience of distributing one file and referencing only one file name rather than a group of files. See self-extracting archive and archive formats.

(2) (verb) To compress one or more files and folders into a single file for backup or transport. Although archived files may remain on the same computer, "archive" implies data retention, and archived data are typically stored in a secondary location for backup and historical purposes. See archive program, archive formats, backup software, active archiving and HSM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Records managers and those in combined RM/archives roles should take note of the recommendation that archivists make more use of inventories and identification of privacy or confidentiality concerns provided by the records creators.
Practicing archivists are likely to find these chapters to be the most lacking, but archival arrangement and description are difficult to explain concisely and the chapters do provide an accessible entry point into the subjects despite their shortcomings.
Both Fox and Homo are members of the Society of American Archivists.
1) Collecting and preserving Baptist stories: Documenting the lives and ministries of Baptists through acquiring collections of correspondence, diaries, and manuscripts is central to the work of Baptist librarians and archivists and necessary for the work of Baptist historians.
Two types of cases were considered by the Archivists in this study: cases of acute care (major cases) and cases of day surgery (minor cases).
Krzysztof Adamiec, National Portrait Gallery assistant archivist, said: "By matching diary entries, with sketches, notes and other material in the collection a unique record is revealed.
Not only does Millar provide expert guidance but she assists her fellow archivists by imparting this knowledge, for the more people who donate their records according to her intelligent advice, the more research will be facilitated.
Lester Sullivan, university archivist and head of Special Collections, highlighted a number of remarkable treasures, including one of the surviving copies of Les Cenelles (The Mayhaws), the earliest anthology of poetry by people of African descent in the U.
Archives & Archivists In The Information Age is a resource that explains in depth the impact, necessity, value and future of archives--particularly digital and virtual archives--in the current technology-driven era.
Archivists would like to see an "opt-in/opt-out" provision added.
She also notes that a "lack of understanding and trust in placing out papers with an institution" are issues archivists of African American descent have to address in public forums to elevate visibility and demystify the process.

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