Areopagitica


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Areopagitica

pamphlet supporting freedom of the press. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 46]
See: Freedom
References in classic literature ?
He held the licensing law in contempt, and to show his contempt he published Areopagitica without a license and without giving the printer's or bookseller's name.
In this manner, Raphael embodies the central principle of Areopagitica (namely, that humanity must, with some qualification, be able to participate in free inquiry in the public sphere) by, paradoxically, embodying that essay's two greatest extremes, specifically the restrictive licensing and unbounded license between which Milton seeks to negotiate.
A champion of free speech, and a disciple of John Milton's Areopagitica, he was reluctant to discipline, let alone expel, leftist rebels from Militant Tendency when they campaigned against the parliamentary party.
self-government is seen acutely in his 1644 Areopagitica, a tract he
As Milton's Areopagitica has it, "we bring not innocence into the world," but "impurity .
Greater freedom of expression, as John Milton noted in Areopagitica, means that bad ideas will proliferate as well as good ones, but it also means that bad ideas are more likely to be challenged.
Writing in English, Latin, and Italian, he achieved international renown within his lifetime, and his celebrated Areopagitica (1644) - written in condemnation of pre-publication censorship - is among history's most influential and impassioned defenses of free speech and freedom of the press.
The following year saw The Adventures of Chanticleer and Tartlet, a story from the Brothers Grimm, again with a frontispiece by Bensemann, and Areopagitica, Milton's great essay about free speech, reflecting Glover's concern at the closing down in 1940 of the radical magazine Tomorrow (1934-40)--in effect by government pressure--with which he was closely associated through its seven-year existence.
She then suggests that Johnson's allegorical war between Truth and Falsehood in Rambler 96 recalls--"consciously or unconsciously"--Milton's allegory of Truth in Areopagitica.
Manley relates Measure for Measure to the concept of engaged virtue in Milton's Areopagitica (1642): to live in the city is to engage with vice, but without such engagement, there is no possibility of virtue.
Other topics include infants and the battle for the future in The Faerie Queene, Milton's compressed memory in Areopagitica of Spenser's Cave of Mammon, art and objectivity in the House of Busirane, Spenser's "May" eclogue and charitable admonition, Henry Lok and holy disorder in devotional lyric, evidence from Thomas Middleton on Spenserianism and satire before and after the bishops' ban, and a mortgage agreement of Edmund Spenser's grandson Hugolin Spenser.
Selections from prose treatises include his works on divorce, education, Areopagitica, the Tenure of Kings, and the Free Commonwealth.