Ariadne

(redirected from Ariadne's thread)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Ariadne

(ărēăd`nē), in Greek mythology, Cretan princess, daughter of MinosMinos
, in Greek mythology, king of Crete, son of Zeus and Europa. He was the husband of Pasiphaë, who bore him Androgeus, Glaucus, Ariadne, and Phaedra. Because Minos failed to sacrifice a beautiful white bull to Poseidon, the god caused Pasiphaë to conceive a lustful
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Pasiphaë. She loved TheseusTheseus
, in Greek mythology, hero of Athens; son of either King Aegeus or Poseidon. Before Aegeus left Troezen he placed his sword and sandals beneath a huge rock and told his wife Aethra that when their son, Theseus, could lift the rock he was to bring the gifts to his kingdom
..... Click the link for more information.
, and gave him the skein of thread that enabled him to make his way out of the labyrinth after killing the Minotaur. When Theseus left Crete, Ariadne went with him, but before they reached Greece, he abandoned her at Naxos. There the god DionysusDionysus
, in Greek religion and mythology, god of fertility and wine. Legends concerning him are profuse and contradictory. However, he was one of the most important gods of the Greeks and was associated with various religious cults. He was probably in origin a Thracian deity.
..... Click the link for more information.
 consoled and later married her. She bore him several children, including Oenopion, whom Dionysus first taught the art of winemaking. It was said that Zeus granted Ariadne immortality and that Dionysus set her bridal crown, the Corona Borealis, among the stars. Subsequent treatments include nearly 50 operas by Monteverdi, Handel, Massenet, Richard Strauss, Milhaud, Martiṅ, and others.

Ariadne

deserted by her lover Theseus at Naxos. [Gk. Myth.: Benét 48]

Ariadne

Minos’s daughter; gave Theseus thread by which to escape labyrinth. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 31]
See: Escape
References in periodicals archive ?
Compassionate and wise, Ariadne's Thread inspires no dogma: it asks only for understanding, reconciliation, and a willingness to forge new beginnings and new friendships.
In the intertextual "montage" Montaigne expects his reader to perform, the motif of Ariadne's thread ("fil d'Ariane") becomes crucial to the investigation of the role the essayist assigns to women in the achievement of a superior male "jouyssance":
Marianne too has chosen joy, whereas Lawrence chooses order--two similar ends of Ariadne's thread.
Ariadne's Thread features a prepubescent girl in hula position (sans hoop) sandwiched between two landscapes: the one in which she stands and the inverted suburban house and lawn that serve as "sky.
The cord, our Ariadne's thread, loops its way through an ever-increasing welter of stuff as we follow it along, until it disappears, a room and a half later, into a chamber built into a wall, which is stuffed with heterogeneous household objects, but stuffed, if such a thing is possible, in a crystalline way - a disorder that looks ordered.
He crumples aluminum foil into various formless forms - balls, drops, stalactitic shapes - or he rolls it into a creeping vine, an Ariadne's thread connecting every object in his labyrinthine installations.
Ariadne's thread resonated both literally and conceptually in Barrio's exhibition.
Indeed, it is not dependent on interpretation in a conventional sense (as, say, from an entrenched sectarian point of view), but indeed on careful analysis, never letting go the Ariadne's thread of gnostic knowledge and insight, always keeping in view the threefold experience of encounter, apprehension, and love.
The story of Ariadne's thread leading Theseus out of the labyrinth is a useful metaphor for the strands that bring this book to the reader out of what had been cultural obscurity.
Engraving and Etching offers Ariadne's thread to print historians.
Professor Genet provides for the French (and for readers of French) another Ariadne's thread to help them through the labyrinth of Yeats's astonishing mind.
Ariadne's thread, the woman says, runs you out of the labyrinth.