Arians


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Arians

4th-century heretical sect; denied Christ’s divinity. [Christian Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 43]
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Arians said Lindley is ''light years'' better now than he was when he took the field in Seattle.
We are thrilled and honored to be a sponsor for the Arians Family Foundation Celebrity Golf Classic and support the important work they do to help children," said Justin Bagnato, managing director of Scottsdale Car Service.
Although it's not a typical model," Arians says, "it's working really well the way it is.
Houston will have top running back Arian Foster in the starting lineup this week, after he left the Texans 23-6 loss to the Minnesota Vikings due to an irregular heartbeat.
Daring Arians, fearless Capricorns and happy-go-lucky Sagittarians all tended to choose the longest repayment periods for their loans.
Rubenstein believes that the Arian controversy caused Christianity to separate itself from a moral culture shared with Judaism, create a new kind of monotheism, and elevate heresy from difference of opinion to crime.
I think that each man in the locker room, each coach and everybody in the Colts organization, is striving to do the same thing," Arians said of making the playoffs, something that seemed silly at the start of the season, what with the Colts having won just two games last year.
Borchardt, Hilary of Poitiers' Role in the Arian Struggle (The Hague, 1966); E.
Continuing Arian influence at court caused him to be deposed and exiled five times (335,339,356,362,365).
Appointed (372) Bishop of Nyssa, he was unequal to administrative problems and the Arian rivals, being deposed in 376.
Arian Silver Corporation Jim Williams, CEO David Taylor, Company Secretary Fuad Sillem, Head of Corporate Development Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 6599 fsillem@ariansilver.
The major and persistent Arian heresy coincided with the advent of Constantine (306-337), the first emperor to protect and promote Christianity, though both Hadrian (117-138) and Alexander Severus (222-235) had intended to erect temples to Christ, the latter (who included a bust of Jesus in his private pantheon) being deterred by pagan advisers who said if he did, all the world would, become Christian.