Aristaeus


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Related to Aristaeus: Troilus

Aristaeus

(ărĭstē`əs), in Greek mythology, son of Apollo and Cyrene, especially honored as the inventor of beekeeping. Aristaeus tried to violate Eurydice, wife of Orpheus. Eurydice was fatally bitten by a snake while fleeing him. As punishment, the nymphs, who had previously been his mentors, caused all his bees to die. However, he sacrificed several cattle in atonement, and from their carcasses new swarms of bees were generated. Learned in the arts of medicine and soothsaying, Aristaeus wandered through many lands teaching his skills and curing the sick. He came to be widely worshiped as a beneficent deity.

Aristaeus

honored as inventor of beekeeping. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 105]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
Notwithstanding Cyrene's assurance that Proteus will supply Aristaeus with praecepta (4.
Cyrene's intercession bridges this gap; in fact, Proteus' puzzling utterance and her surprisingly practical response seem to constitute a kind of shared language to which Aristaeus has no access.
20 -- and which have been taken to have the demigod Aristaeus as their answer, pro ve more difficult to answer once the radical contribution of Cyrene is acknowledged.
Proteus' tale of Orpheus and Eurydice is replaced by a confrontation between Proteus and Aristaeus in which no intervention or mediation is required and, like Eidothea, Cyrene is not present for the seer's utterance.
Cyrene's presence is once again an essential component of Virgil's model pedagogy when Aristaeus returns to the grove after his sacrifice to the nymphs:
Cyrene's instructions to Aristaeus, and Arisraeus' methodical execution of those instructions, play out in its entirety a didactic relational drama between preceptor and student that is otherwise only rendered in the Georgics in a variety of fragmentary and destabilized forms.
it is perhaps not surprising that Aristaeus is not alone when he revisits the grove to offer Orpheus' funeral dues ("monstrum I aspiciunt" [4.
Ogilby's own decision as translator in his 1654 edition is still more radical than Cleyn's engraving (which does at least acknowledge the verbal clue that Aristaeus has been accompanied to the grove).
Some humanist commentators supply a more explicit rationale for Ogilby's decision to send Aristaeus alone to the grove.
For this reader, at least, Cyrene has accompanied Aristaeus to the grove.
Notwithstanding the extreme view that such notes merely confirm the dull copyin g and subservient reading that humanist pedagogy encouraged,32 the anonymous reader's repetition of Ascensius' note provides a surprisingly useful analogue to the pedagogical dynamic that links Aristaeus to Cyrene and which makes her presence necessary at the grove.
A crowd of men share in Aristaeus' shock, and two of them have raised their hands in a gesture that mimics that of Aristaeus.