Aristarchus


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Related to Aristarchus: Hipparchus

Aristarchus

(ăr'ĭstär`kəs), in the New Testament, Macedonian companion of Paul.

Aristarchus

(a-ră-star -kŭs) See table at craters.

Aristarchus

[‚ar·ə′stär·kəs]
(astronomy)
A crater on the moon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tour stops included in this breathtaking journey across the moon's surface are: Orientale Basin, Shackleton crater, South Pole-Aitken Basin, Tycho crater, Aristarchus Plateau, Mare Serenitatis, Compton-Belkovich volcano, Jackson crater and Tsiolkovsky crater.
A convincing empirical rebuttal can be found in the 2011 May issue of Selenology Today, which contains a report by Jim Phillips & Rafaello Lena that CCD images of Aristarchus obtained earlier that year under lighting conditions similar to the 1963 events recorded an elongated reddish area running along the western rim of Aristarchus that corresponded very closely to the principal glow reported by Greenacre & Barr.
Astronomer and mathematician Aristarchus of Samos (ca.
The book begins with a discussion that tells the story of man's pursuit of the ellipse, from Aristarchus to Newton's successful unveiling nearly two millenniums later.
The 1963 Aristarchus events are two of the most credible and famous visual TLP reports on record.
Aristarchus thought as much, so did Brahe, and even Galileo admitted he did not have proof.
London, Jan 3 (ANI): NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has captured shots of a massive Aristarchus crater on moon, which is even visible to the naked eye.
He begins in ancient Athens, and works forward through such figures as Plato, Aristarchus, Apollonius, Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho, Louis XIV, Newton, and Einstein.
On the contrary, Copernicus, a Polish canon of Frauenburg Cathedral, based his heliocentric findings on a theory originally proposed by Aristarchus of Samos, a Greek scientist of the third century B.
They return on Palm Sunday to discover a small remnant of survivors, including an astronomer, Aristarchus Jones, three Benedictine monks, two black men, some deformed children, and Abbot Liebowitz, a convert to Catholicism from Judaism, an "ex-physicist, ex-Brooklynite, [who] looked like a shtetl shopkeeper stranded in the Sinai desert for forty years" (Cosmos 243).
With these composite visible-light and ultraviolet images of a 42-kilometer-wide crater called Aristarchus at the moon's near side, the Hubble Space Telescope is mapping the mineral ilmenite.
But this Aristarchus, says Alciato, would do better either to put up stronger arguments or to concede the point to Cicero's authority.