Aristippus


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Related to Aristippus: Antisthenes, Epicurus

Aristippus

(ărĭstĭp`əs), c.435–c.360 B.C., Greek philosopher of Cyrene, first of the CyrenaicsCyrenaics
, one of the minor schools of Greek philosophy, flourishing in the late 4th and early 3d cent. B.C. Cyrenaic philosophy taught that present individual pleasure is the highest good.
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. He held pleasure to be the highest good and virtue to be identical with the ability to enjoy. His doctrines, comprising the first coherent exposition of hedonismhedonism
[Gr.,=pleasure], the doctrine that holds that pleasure is the highest good. Ancient hedonism expressed itself in two ways: the cruder form was that proposed by Aristippus and the early Cyrenaics, who believed that pleasure was achieved by the complete gratification of
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, opposed those of the Cynics, although both groups drew upon aspects of Socratic philosophy.
References in periodicals archive ?
At line 17, Horace states his approval of Aristippus's ways: Diogenes posed as a self-sufficient sage but nevertheless depended on handouts, while Aristippus openly pursued benefits for his services.
52) In any case, as the epistle progresses, it becomes apparent that Aristippus was less important to Horace as an exemplar of a morally free client than as an exemplar of a successful client who appeared as such.
For Aristippus to appear in this context as someone worthy of emulation indicates that he played this game well.
It is sometimes asserted that the virtue Aristippus and Horace aimed for in one's life and social relations resided in balance or in the mean between two extremes.
43) Aristippus also related tha t Aristotle composed a hymn in praise of Hermias, which Diogenes faithfully reproduces in full.
63) This is the tradition variously relayed by Aristippus (64) and by Theocritus of Chios.
More properly pseudo-Aristippus, as Aristippus is not generally thought to be the author of the work used by Diogenes.
fv (v): "Porro Aristippus in primo de antiquis deliciis libro Aristotelem air Hermiae pellicem adamasse, quam ille cum sibi permisisset; duxisse earn er gaudio elatum immolasse mulieri, ut Athenienses Eleusinae Cereri.
45) But there was also much medieval precedent: a partial translation of Laertius by Henricus Aristippus (known to Aquinas) and the more well known - and widely disseminated - De vita et moribus philosophorum of Walter of Burley, written in the generation after Aquinas.