Aristotelian

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Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, the quest motif has likewise been used to depict the underlying ethical vision of Aristotelean virtue ethics (Lear, 2003; MacIntyre, 1984, 1999) and the therapeutic process (Frattoroli, 2001).
The "generalisation de la metaphoricite par la mise en abyme d'une metaphore determinee" ('the generalization of metaphor by plunging into abyme one determined metaphor') shows the Aristotelean logic of metaphoricity, in which metaphor properly carries over the essence of a pre-linguistic and determining referent (resemblance), as being always already divided (262).
The advocacy by some theorists of an Aristotelean framework of A/B terms in place of dichotomy proposes to solve the problem of dualisms in the ostrich-like way of refusing to allow us to represent them.
In their introduction to the play, Hardin Craig and David Bevington claim that "to blame the tragedy in Aristotelean fashion on [Romeo's] and Juliet's impulsiveness is .
In this article series, I am encouraging and seeking to model a re-constructive dialogue between three major approaches in contemporary interdisciplinary moral psychology: Aristotelean virtue ethics (MacIntyre, 1984), relational psychoanalytic thought and spirituality (Hall, 2004), and moral emotion theory and research (Emmons & McCullough, 2004).
With respect to properly interpreting altruism, the key Aristotelean notion is his answer to the question, "Why act ethically?
These peculiar, periphrastic locutions do somewhat more, however, than merely confirm our quasi-Aristotelean formulation of the Homeric self as a "unified functioning of bodily stuffs"; they also help us to complement that characterization in a certain crucial way, one which indicates an important distinction between the Homeric and Aristotelean notions of dynamic selfhood.
Smith notes, many early modern writers try to reconcile Aristotelean views of voice as soul with their own observations about the voice's physical properties.
As David Perkins argues, writing literary history entails selecting texts for evidence and making them "constituents of a discursive form with a beginning, a middle, and an end, if it is Aristotelean narration, or with a statement, development, and conclusion, if it is an argument" (19).
Hegel's syllogism reflects basic Aristotelean logic--part of the Western philosophical tradition (see Olson, 1999 for a related discussion of Aristotle and classification).
Widdershoven implies, I did not intend to give an Aristotelean, or any other sort of "foundation" for clinical ethics.