Aristotelian


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Related to Aristotelian: Aristotelian philosophy

Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
He is an advocate of the view that what may be called the Aristotelian revolution in medieval political thought, which began in the later thirteenth century, has been much exaggerated.
For instance, Aristotle's account of pleasure is both textually complicated (because of the dual accounts in Nicomachean Ethics 7 and 10) and interscholastically complicated (because of the initial rivalry between Aristotelian and Epicurean schools in the third century B.
Scholars of philosophy explore causality as Spanish Jesuit Francisco Su[sz]rez (1548-1617) treats it in his 1597 Disputationes Metaphysicae, specifically his interpretation of the four Aristotelian causes and their role and relevance in his metaphysics.
The prevailing Aristotelian system, its linguistic structure, and its fixity or rigidity consequentially still seem to be looming large over the critical domain in terms of interpretation of the diasporic production.
Ever since Myles Burnyeat's 1992 essay on Aristotle's psychology of perception, there has been a broad agreement that the Aristotelian tradition has quite a different agenda from the Cartesian one when it comes to questions of mind, body, and soul.
Their topics include key formulations (including papers on critical realism and substance, causality and substance, essence and accident, conceptual and natural necessity, and powers and depositions), realism about causality in philosophy (the interaction of meaning and truth with causal explanation, Aristotelian powers, the causal realist manifesto, powers without essences, causal exclusion and evolved emergent properties, and "natural kinds" in psychology), and realism about causality in social science (sociology political science, and Marxist theories).
The present volume, which is the revised version of the author's PhD dissertation at the University of Berlin, deals, as the title indicates, with the reception of the Aristotelian De anima in the late Renaissance and early modern period.
This section shows that al-Biruni's dissatisfaction with the answers he had received was ultimately based on his own independent views about the nature of the physical world which were in stark contrast to the views held by the Paripatetics who based their views on Aristotelian physics.
Lisska's repristination of Aristotelian teleology may be within speaking distance of neo-Aristotelians like Martha Nussbaum, but it is not going to persuade the likes of Richard Rorty or Dworkin.
Even though she gives a passing nod to the most important theorist of virtue, Aristotle, Burtt's presentation of the politics of virtue depends almost entirely on a Roman construction found in the work of thinkers like Cicero, Machiavelli, and Sydney, which, despite her conflating it with its Aristotelian predecessor, is substantively and qualitatively different from the latter.
Redpath's discussion of virtue is securely anchored in an Aristotelian realism, a metaphysics of being that finds expression in Aquinas and in his contemporary disciples such as Etienne Gilson and Jacques Maritain.
Pontano's Virtues: Aristotelian Moral and Political Thought in the Renaissance