Aristotelian

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Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, in light of his general employment of the basic categories of Aristotle's taxonomy of knowledge, I do not think that this locates him outside the ambit of Aristotelianism properly construed.
The latter half of Ardizzone's book, meanwhile, is notable for its exquisitely, at times excessively, nuanced treatment of the poet's engagement with the many varieties of 13th-century Aristotelianism, both orthodox and heterodox.
For the Orthodox Neoplatonism was the dominant philosophy ancillary to Christian doctrine; and the rationalist application of Aristotelianism to Christian doctrine in the Latin church was always unsettling to the Orthodox.
Heterodox Antecedents of "Ruizian Naturalism": From Radical Aristotelianism to Heresy
She does so by presenting his arguments, but more importantly, by examining the status of the doctrine within contemporary Scholastic Aristotelianism, which influenced Descartes through his early education at the Jesuit College, La Fleche.
It is at this point in Halbertal's narrative that the parallel universes of Kabbalah and Jewish Aristotelianism collide.
In assessing an agent's virtue we must appeal to such counterfactuals, rather than just the situations the agent happens to encounter, because Aristotelianism is ultimately concerned with the nature of a person's commitment to a virtue.
As a champion of neo-scholasticism and Aristotelianism, he became one of the main opponents of Rene Descartes and his Dutch followers.
Flanagan draws on philosophy, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and psychology, as well as on transformative mindfulness and self-cultivation practices that come from such spiritual traditions as Buddhism, Confucianism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism.
They differ in this respect from Platonism and Aristotelianism, which cultivate open-ended inquiry into phenomena guided by a love for the goodness, beauty, and truth of the beings that present themselves to us on their own terms.
Chapters explore the theoretical bases behind what Aristotle said about ethical, political and productive activity; Aristotle's practical philosophy as well as his theoretical philosophy; and applications of his ideas in settings ranging from medieval Christian times to Germany to revolutionary Aristotelianism in modern history including MacIntyre's Marxism.
Thomas's synthesis of Aristotelianism, neo-Platonism, and revelation was ongoing from the more Aristotelian categories of the In sententias to the more neo-Platonic emphasis of later works.