Aristotelian

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Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
24)) Semi-Platonist Aristotelianism explains the metaphysics underlying these different aspects of the objectivity of mathematics.
This is the concern that Aristotelianism sets an impossibly high standard of technical/empirical knowledge for the would-be possessor of virtue.
1076a) in terms of divine design and government; and finally, the patristic evidence relating to Aristotelian teaching attributes belief in divine providence to Aristotelianism.
However, he does not see that Nietzsche's creation of new values is less a creation ex nihilo than an experimental reinterpretation of human nature that offers a hyperbolic version of MacIntyre's own alternative, a kind of historicized Aristotelianism.
The first step in the introduction of a new idea, such as the mechanical philosophy, is the rejection of the old one, in this case, Aristotelianism (2).
Jewish history attests to countless manifestations of this dynamic from Philo's Platonism to Maimonedes' Aristotelianism, up to and including the secular nationalism of religious Zionists like Ray Kook.
Unburdened by the cool metaphysics of 13th-century Christian Aristotelianism, a la Saint Thomas, these first followers of Jesus experienced the Lord's Real Presence in the communal gathering itself, in the breaking of the bread, the sharing of wine, the forgiving of offenses done by brother to brother, in the reading of the scriptural word.
It is the argument of this project that vernacular Aristotelianism made fundamental contributions to the thought of the period, anticipating many of the features of early modern philosophy and contributing to a new encyclopaedia of knowledge.
and his work represents a move away from the Aristotelianism of Thomas Aquinas and a return to an earlier Augustinianism.
Nor is this merely a limited case-study; Grendler's excellent grasp of context allows us to grasp how the Jesuits at Mantua struggled to reconcile their curriculum with contemporary debates about Aristotelianism, moral probabilism, and the very nature of pedagogy, as well as how the tempestuous politics of the time affected almost every aspect of life for the Gonzaga and their subjects alike.
Jane Hood focuses on the Aristotelianism of Galen's definitions.
Kantianism (through Kant himself and the early John Rawls), and finally Aristotelianism.