Aristotelian

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Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
In his earlier works, Wallace had established that Galileo's conception of scientific explanation was essentially Aristotelian and that his treatment of it in MS Gal.
Another group of essays tackles the representational and intentional nature of thought, again focusing on problems related to intellectual cognition in specific (as opposed to sensation and the workings of the 'inward wits' such as memory--each of these would merit a separate treatment in any full consideration of the Aristotelian tradition).
No less an historian than Etienne Gilson found that Albert's writings, especially his Aristotelian commentaries, represented "a gigantic literary production which defies analysis.
The most direct reason for taking an Aristotelian realist view of properties is that we perceive them.
Jude Dougherty's main point seems to be that science is a realism-based enterprise and thus it falls under Aristotelian philosophy.
without realizing that the Aristotelian Indo-Europeans are today only a small minority in this world (although to a large extent in control).
Now the idea that one's end regulates one's activities is distinctly Aristotelian, so again Henry is making his case on Aristotelian grounds.
Now this could be because, as Aristotelians hold, such a life is not good for the agent.
Jiyuan Yu employs this image in his comparative study of Confucian and Aristotelian ethics.
Moreover, when faced with such an outburst of new disciplines and also success (an astronomy critical of Ptolemaic models, optics reformed and renewed, an algebra created, an algebraic geometry invented, a Diophantine analysis transformed, a theory of the parallels discussed, projective methods developed, and so on) can it be imagined that philosophers remained unperturbed by these developments, as to deduce that they were strictly confined to the relatively narrow frame of the Aristotelian tradition of neo-Platonism?
Heidegger seeks at this time--and here all scholars are in agreement--a genuine form of life that goes beyond the traditional Aristotelian opposition between "theory" and "praxis.
This was the conviction of some Aristotelians historically and it remains a vivid dream for some today, either in terms of an Aristotelian system to be reconstructed systematically or (somewhat more modestly) in terms of an explanatory framework to be applied across domains when analyzing the Philosopher's works.