arm

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Related to Armes: Hermes, ARNES

arm,

upper limb in humans. Three long bones form the framework of the arm: the humerus of the upper arm, and the radius (outer bone) and ulna (inner bone) of the forearm. The radius and ulna run parallel but meet at their ends in such a manner that the radius can rotate around the ulna. This arrangement permits turning the forearm to bring the hand palm up (supination) or palm down (pronation). The radius and ulna hinge with the bones of the hand at the wrist, and with the humerus at the elbow. The bicepsbiceps
, any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue
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 brachii, a muscle of the upper arm, bends the arm at the elbow; the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii straightens the arm. Movement of the arm across the chest and above the head is accomplished by the pectoral muscles of the chest and deltoid muscles of the shoulder, respectively. In an adult the arm is normally five sixths as long as the leg.

Arm

 

the upper extremity in man consisting of the shoulder, forearm, and hand (carpus, metacarpus, and phalanges of the fingers). The arm is a more developed grasping extremity in man than in man’s ancient ancestors, the Anthropomorphidae.

The transformation from Anthropomorphidae to man was largely promoted by freeing the anterior extremities, or arms, from locomotion and body-support functions and converting them into organs capable of performing work operations. As the arm became adapted to work, its structure substantially changed, becoming sharply distinct from the structure of the anterior extremity of Anthropomorphidae.

The most significant structural changes occurred in the hand. In Anthropomorphidae the hand has an underdeveloped thumb and the remaining fingers are greatly elongated; in contrast, the human hand is characterized by a powerfully developed thumb that is essential in performing all work operations. The remaining fingers of the human hand are significantly shorter than those of Anthropoidea but are nevertheless capable of the most delicate and differentiated movements.

In man’s development, the development of the arm as a work organ occurred simultaneously with the progressive development of the brain.

The body processes in brachiopods, the tentacles in cephalopods, and the mobile or nonmobile rays of echinoderms are sometimes called arms.

arm

[ärm]
(anatomy)
The upper or superior limb in humans which comprises the upper arm with one bone and the forearm with two bones.
(control systems)
A robot component consiting of an interconnected set of links and powered joints that move and support the wrist socket and end effector.
(electricity)
(engineering acoustics)
(geology)
A ridge or a spur that extends from a mountain.
(mathematics)
A side of an angle.
(naval architecture)
The part of an anchor extending from the crown to one of the flukes.
(oceanography)
A long, narrow inlet of water extending from another body of water.
(ordnance)
A combat branch of a military force; specifically, a branch of the U.S. Army, such as the Infantry Armored Cavalry, the primary function of which is combat.
(Often plural) Weapons for use in war.
To supply with arms.
To ready ammunition for detonation, as by removal of safety devices or alignment of the explosive elements in the explosive train of the fuse.
(physics)
The perpendicular distance from the line along which a force is applied to a reference point.

ARM

(processor)
Advanced RISC Machine.

Originally Acorn RISC Machine.

ARM

(company)
Advanced RISC Machines Ltd.

ARM

(publication)
["The Annotated C++ Reference Manual", Margaret A. Ellis and Bjarne Stroustrup, Addison-Wesley, 1990].

ARM

(hardware)
References in periodicals archive ?
Il a demande aux Nations Unies, la MINUAD et les organisations internationales a condamner cet incident et prendre des mesures contre ceux qui ont commis ce crime terrible des mouvements armes.
Gale Gilchrist, prosecuting, explained how the officer, who used the name 'Stu', saw Armes in the toilets at the Blandford Arms pub and asked if he had any cannabis in November 2010.
Armes was under the influence of drugs when he smashed his way into a neighbour's house ripping doors off their hinges and stealing a pounds 350 television set and a pounds 180 Xbox.
It has brought us in more customers than it has ever kept away," the Daily Mail quoted Armes as saying.
L'epidemie de violence par balle ne sevit pas autant au Canada qu'aux Etats-Unis, mais les lobbys des armes a feu sont actifs ici aussi, et ils tentent depuis des annees de faire barrage ou d'annuler les lois et les politiques progressistes qui visent a reduire ce type de violence.
Former sports photographer Armes, who launched the fundraiser with then-Hall Green general manager David Birkett in 1979, said: "I've enjoyed every minute of it and will miss it, but I promised my wife Jane I'd step down on my birthday.
Mr Armes said: "It was very frightening, but everyone who put their names down just got on with it and jumped.
I believe people who have supported us in the past will not be prepared to pay the increased prices," said Mr Armes.
Label France On les appelle " armes lE[umlaut]gE res " ou " petites armes ", car elles sont d'un faible encombrement-; mais il s'agit pourtant bien d'" armes de destruction massive ", responsables de la mort de prE s de 300 000 personnes par an, selon des chiffres publiE[umlaut]s par les Nations unies.
BROOKFIELD Dolores (DesRosiers) Armes, 80, passed away on Thursday February 1, 2007 in St.
African Filmmaking: North and South of the Sahara by Roy Armes Indiana University Press, September 2006 $75, ISBN 0-253-34853-6
Weiner, in his current ``Martin's Guide to Wine Bargains,'' lists this wine, the 2003 Les Armes de France, presently available at Trader Joe's, along with other good wine buys in the Los Angeles area.