Arrhenius equation


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Arrhenius equation

[ar′rā·nē·əs i′kwā·zhən]
(physical chemistry)
The relationship that the specific reaction rate constant k equals the frequency factor constant s times exp (-Δ Hact/ RT), where Δ Hactis the heat of activation, R the gas constant, and T the absolute temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
The modified or reformulated Arrhenius equation [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is achieved from the plot of DC conductivity versus dielectric constant.
The model based on the Arrhenius equation (Equation 1) permits to evaluate the bacterial stability in different formulations via a method of accelerated degradation.
The apparent activation energy of the EN reaction calculated according to the Arrhenius equation was approximately 38.
Knowledge of the Arrhenius equation parameters is a key for correct mathematical model composition and also for safe and successful control.
Through application of the Arrhenius equation, the release rates of test materials at ambient temperatures in the field can be estimated in a much shorter time by carrying out release studies at elevated temperatures.
Using the Arrhenius equations of deterioration, it was found that the deterioration rate of paper kept at 50[degrees]F (10[degrees]C) and 30% RH or slightly elevated to 60[degrees]F (15[degrees]C) and 40% RH was insignificant for most paper materials when compared to environments in unconditioned storage vaults in basements and attic spaces.
Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions, Gibbs free energy, and Planck's constant all are intertwined with the Arrhenius equation.
The Arrhenius equation (Equation 5) was used to investigate the effect of temperature (T) on the rate of corrosion (CR) of mild steel in the presence and absence of penicillin V potassium (Emregul et al.
Diffusion is known to be an activated process (Skaar 1988) and varies with temperature in accordance with the Arrhenius equation,
s], which would normally be a requirement for the applicability of the Arrhenius equation when it is based on a rate rather than on a rate constant.