Arrhenius equation

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Arrhenius equation

[ar′rā·nē·əs i′kwā·zhən]
(physical chemistry)
The relationship that the specific reaction rate constant k equals the frequency factor constant s times exp (-Δ Hact/ RT), where Δ Hactis the heat of activation, R the gas constant, and T the absolute temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of temperature on both moisture sorption isotherms and the rate of sorption was adequately described by the Arrhenius law so extrapolation of the experimental data to a slightly wider range of temperatures was considered a reasonable approach.
According to the Arrhenius law this temperature rise induces in turn a decrease in viscosity (this effect increases with the initial viscosity) which has two main consequences.
The first relaxation process had similar behavior in nanocomposites as in the references, and the temperature dependence of the relaxation times obeyed the Arrhenius law, also characteristic to [alpha]-relaxation processes.
The temperature dependence of the viscosity is supposed to follow an Arrhenius law.
Phan-Thien/Tanner model and Arrhenius law were used as a rheological model for the simulation.
They are based on the isoconversional principle, which states that the reaction rate at constant extent of conversion is only a function of temperature through an Arrhenius law.
The [gamma] mechanical relaxation has been observed at about -100[degrees]C at 1 Hz (8-11) This transition obeys an Arrhenius law and the activation energy is about 50 kJ/mol (4, 9, 10).
The temperature dependence of viscosity was expressed by an Arrhenius law as reported in the Appendix.
r], assuming the validity of the Arrhenius law, showed only a moderate variation between samples designated 50K and 120K.
The frequency dependence of these relaxations was treated following the Arrhenius law and Starkweather formalism.
11) of the acid and the ester amidation follow similar Arrhenius laws.