Arrogation


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Arrogation

 

(Russian, samoupravstvo), under Soviet criminal law, one of the crimes against the governmental order. It consists in the arbitrary exercise of one’s actual or supposed right in violation of the legally established order, thereby causing substantial harm to citizens or to state or social organizations. Such an act may also be an honest mistake, for example, the unauthorized appropriation of disputed property.

Under the RSFSR Criminal Code (art. 200), arrogation may be punished by corrective labor for a term not exceeding 6 months, by a fine of up to 50 rubles, or by social censure; or it may entail the application of measures of social pressure. Arrogation committed by an official using his position is viewed as the exceeding of authority or official powers.

References in periodicals archive ?
Returning specifically to the idea of the tested arrogations of authorship: the entire project of Modernism and the Grounds of Law is ostensively acknowledged and introduced by its author as being intimately engaged in conversation with other voices in creatively different ways.
As such, the human of human rights is susceptible of an encapsulated arrogation in a variety of national, imperial and 'global' manifestations.
Like the previous method, this method of response is problematic due to the court's arrogation of a role properly belonging to the legislature.
With his eighteenth-century sensibilities, however, he could not have predicted the extent of twentieth-century arrogation of political power by the regulatory state: "Allowing the utmost latitude to the love of power which any reasonable man require, I confess I am at a loss to discover what temptation the persons intrusted with the administration of the general government could ever feel to divest the States of [their residuary authority].
Eager to legitimate its ambitious arrogation of power, the French crown heavily subsidized theorists of raison d'etat, which enabled the crown to make bigger claims than the traditional language of crown, estates, and parlements.
It is Martin's contention that the Supreme Court of Canada, by its overweening arrogation of authority in matters beyond its proper business, has destroyed the possibility of constitutional democracy.
Bush's arrogation of ``wartime'' power to secretly eavesdrop on telephonic and electronic communications with no check by judicial authority.
It is an image not of moral impropriety but of an unjustifiable metaphysical arrogation of the universe.
To add to this section the further requirement that such a process is "useful" only when a "use" for a known end product is disclosed seems to us to be an improper arrogation of the authority delegated to Congress by the Constitution.
It was, therefore, no surprise that Ayatollah Khomeini's arrogation of the right to speak on behalf of all of Iranian Shia Islam was greatly resented by many leading ayatollahs, several of whom outranked him in the religious hierarchy before the Iranian Revolution.
Perhaps the media's long-standing arrogation to itself of the right to make pontifical judgments on matters of life and death has made such delusions inevitable.
Instead of revealing misplaced pride and the arrogation of God's functions, as in The Distant Sound, Handel's biblical allusions deepen the sense of his joy at reaching the converging point of music and the Godhead, at resolving his individual self into an ineffable state in which his music is one segment of an entire cosmos of light and sound.