Ars Amatoria


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Ars Amatoria

Ovid’s treatise on lovemaking. [Rom. Lit.: Magill IV, 45]
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In the Ars Amatoria the cynical Magister Amoris extols the advantages of the theatre to find suitable prey for his pupil's amatory advances (and advancement).
Enterline's analysis in this chapter leans heavily on Ovid's Ars amatoria, as does the chapter on Venus and Adonis, as a pedagogical text in which love and mastery are inextricably combined.
Ironically enough, both of these commentators, in order to incorporate Ovid's elegiac Ars amatoria into their classification of 'didactic poetry', have ignored the basic criterion of hexameter verse, if we are to assume that the ancients would have placed didactic poetry within the general class of epic (as Toohey argues).
The Ars Amatoria was composed in two stages between 1 BC and AD 2 and has been variously described as an elegy on seduction (it is written in elegiac couplets, a Greek format) and sexual attraction or as a parody on didactic verse.
Alluding to Ovid's banishment from Rome to the distant shores of the Black Sea for offending the emperor Augustus in his Ars Amatoria, Lowell mentions "black" three times.
1969, or the love, as he presented it in his long cantata Ars amatoria (1967).
Most of Ovid's major works are challenged: Metamorphoses, Ars amatoria, Amores, Fasti, and Heroides are brought forward in comparison with English, French, and Italian Renaissance writers who imitated Ovid's works of different genres in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
He is the author, after all, of famously lascivious love manuals and erotic poetry, teaching in his Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) how to pick up girls outside the Forum and generally mocking the pretensions of early imperial Rome, which caused Augustus to exile him in late middle-age.
Allowing that the book has no formal concluding chapter to synthesize arguments and that the introduction is largely concerned with the place of Jean de Meun's Rose in the cultural inheritance of Ovid's Ars amatoria and Remedia amoris, one might look to the final chapter `Pruning the Rose' to provide the otherwise missing conclusion.
Given its fictional quality, the medieval ars amatoria is free to draw upon the two categories of exegesis and dialectic, inhabiting the space between the "Both/ And" and the "Either/ Or.
Beginning with an informed and informative description and introduction by Professor Graves Haydon Thompson, "Ovid: Ars Amatoria/Remedia Amoris" is a superbly presented text of Ovid's Ars Amatoria presented in a three section: Liber Primus; Liber Secundus; and Liber Tertius.