Arsenal

(redirected from Arsenals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

arsenal

[′ärs·nəl]
(ordnance)
An installation whose primary mission is research, development, and manufacture pertaining to assigned items or components.
An installation having coequal missions of maintenance and supply for assigned items or components.

Arsenal

 

a military establishment designed to receive, store, register, and distribute armament and ammunition to troops, to assemble and repair them, and to manufacture certain of their component parts.

Up to the end of the 19th century most of the arsenals of all countries were occupied with the mass production of many kinds of armament and ammunition for the land and naval forces. Arsenal plants had on their premises storehouses of weapons and armaments. The most important arsenals in Russia were the St. Petersburg arsenal known as the Foundry and Cannon Yard, the Kiev and Briansk arsenals, and the Sevastopol’ and Kronstadt naval arsenals; in Germany, the Munich arsenal; in France, the Lyon arsenal; in England, the Woolwich arsenal; in the USA, the Frankfort and Springfield arsenals and others. In the 20th century the growth of arms production into a basic independent industry necessitated a separation between the point of manufacture and the point of storage of weapons and ammunition. Because of this, arsenals lost their former significance and now serve only as bases or storehouses for various purposes. In the USSR the term “arsenal” is not used to designate a military establishment.

N. A. MALIUGIN

References in classic literature ?
And the two rogues will in France make merry with our money, with the money for our vessels, our arsenals, and our dockyards, which they have sold to Louis XIV.
Following the spread of the secret, sprang up great activity in all the dockyards, arsenals, and navy-yards.
The scout shook his head, and muttering some unintelligible words, among which "throat" and "Iroquois" were alone audible, he walked away, to collect and to examine into the state of the captured arsenal of the Hurons.
It was an arsenal where each arrival left his baggage on arriving, and took it up when departing.
The first tangible cause of disenchantment was when Dick brought home a painter's arsenal on Friday evening.
All the men smiled, for amongst them they carried a small arsenal.