Articles of Confederation


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Articles of Confederation

 

the first constitution of the USA. Ratified in November 1777, the Articles of Confederation served as the basis of American government from 1781 to 1789. They consolidated the conquests of the American Revolution (1775–83) and established a republican form of government in the former English colonies of North America, proclaiming a confederation and an eternal union of states.

References in periodicals archive ?
contrary to the Articles of Confederation or its treaty power.
Although some states in the 1780s serviced some of national debts held by their own citizens, most of the national debt reorganized by Morris remained outstanding and became one of the important drivers in the movement for a new constitution to replace the weak Articles of Confederation.
In fact, he had called for assumption of state debts in 1780 under the Articles of Confederation, and he liked the idea in 1790 as well.
This was a bit of a problem, since the Articles of Confederation required unanimity for any amendment to take effect.
usual practice under the Articles of Confederation, George Clinton
A committee was formed in Congress that eventually produced a report, made available in 1785, recommending that the Articles of Confederation be amended to allow Congress to regulate foreign and interstate commerce.
He was reputed to be the second wealthiest man in the colonies as one of New York's delegates that signed the declaration of Independence in 1776 (and a signer of the Articles of Confederation the US's original constitution).
The result was the creation of the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, which lasted only 7 years.
UNDERSTANDING THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION (0778743721), BILL OF RIGHTS (0778743748), U.
Less then a decade after the Articles of Confederation loosely tied the colonies together, it became clear a stronger bond was needed.
An interesting and often perplexing fact about the founding of the American Republic is why Virginia, one of the strongest and most economically secure states throughout the Revolution, during the subsequent governing period under the Articles of Confederation, and at the beginning of the nation's constitutional history, was unable to maintain its power and authority past the early 1800s.
He suggests that backroom deal-making in Philadelphia taverns likely got the framers through the big sticking points--the most notable of which was the small states tenaciously holding on to their equal status with the larger states under the Articles of Confederation.